Deconstructed Letters of Paulos

Discussion about the New Testament, apocrypha, gnostics, church fathers, Christian origins, historical Jesus or otherwise, etc.
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Jax
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Re: Deconstructed Letters of Paulos

Post by Jax » Sun Jul 28, 2019 12:33 pm

robert j wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 11:16 am
Jax wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:14 pm
Ben C. Smith wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 8:09 pm
Jax wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 10:54 am
1 Corinthians 1_1 - 4_21 Without 2_6-16 and 4_6c and 4_17
I believe what is meant by 1 Corinthians 4.6c is only the phrase "not to go beyond what is written," from a suggestion by John Strugnell:

6 But these things, brethren, I have figuratively applied to myself and Apollos for your sakes, so that you may learn by us not to exceed what is written, so that no one of you should become arrogant in behalf of one against the other. / 6 ταῦτα δέ, ἀδελφοί, μετεσχημάτισα εἰς ἐμαυτὸν καὶ Ἀπολλῶν δι᾽ ὑμᾶς, ἵνα ἐν ἡμῖν μάθητε τὸ μὴ ὑπὲρ ἃ γέγραπται, ἵνα μὴ εἷς ὑπὲρ τοῦ ἑνὸς φυσιοῦσθε κατὰ τοῦ ἑτέρου.

Right on. Thank you Ben. :cheers:
Jax wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 9:38 am

I have edited 1 Cor 4:6c and made the recommended correction pointed out by Ben.
Jax,

I assume by making the “recommended correction“, you mean that you are, at least for now, considering the phrase “not to go beyond what is written“ in 1 Corinthians 4:6 to be an interpolation.

In the link to page 104 that Ben provided, Strugnell suggests the phrase began as a marginal note that became incorporated into the text, but the author of the linked book (Roger S. Bosse) goes on to write on page 105 (Google Books not always providing that page, try hitting the magnify button) ---

“Despite his arguments, Strugnell’s conclusion must be rejected …” (p. 105)

What evidence leads you to think the phrase was a later addition? How strong do you consider evidence for interpolation here?

I’m not likely to get further involved in this discussion at this time, but I’m just curious about your methodology and thought process here.
Hi Robert, I wish that I were competent enough in koine and ancient literature to be able to evaluate the evidence and come to an informed conclusion. I am not. Therefore I must rely on the opinions of those that are. Which at this point are people like William O. Walker Jr and Ben C. Smith among a few others. For now, both people that I have mentioned feel that the phrase is an interpolation (or gloss if you will) and based on that I have removed it pending new evidence to the contrary.

The reason that I post the material here is to invite feedback from some really intelligent people that are really invested in this subject. People like you. If you feel that the passage should remain I will be very interested in hearing your reasons and if sound I will consider putting it back. Nothing I do here is carved in stone and I remain open to all points of view. I'm simply trying to recreate Paul's original letters by crowd sourcing people that seriously study this issue.

I very much look forward to more correspondence from you on this subject and others.

Lane

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Ben C. Smith
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Re: Deconstructed Letters of Paulos

Post by Ben C. Smith » Sun Jul 28, 2019 12:44 pm

Jax wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 12:33 pm
robert j wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 11:16 am
Jax wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:14 pm
Ben C. Smith wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 8:09 pm
Jax wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 10:54 am
1 Corinthians 1_1 - 4_21 Without 2_6-16 and 4_6c and 4_17
I believe what is meant by 1 Corinthians 4.6c is only the phrase "not to go beyond what is written," from a suggestion by John Strugnell:

6 But these things, brethren, I have figuratively applied to myself and Apollos for your sakes, so that you may learn by us not to exceed what is written, so that no one of you should become arrogant in behalf of one against the other. / 6 ταῦτα δέ, ἀδελφοί, μετεσχημάτισα εἰς ἐμαυτὸν καὶ Ἀπολλῶν δι᾽ ὑμᾶς, ἵνα ἐν ἡμῖν μάθητε τὸ μὴ ὑπὲρ ἃ γέγραπται, ἵνα μὴ εἷς ὑπὲρ τοῦ ἑνὸς φυσιοῦσθε κατὰ τοῦ ἑτέρου.

Right on. Thank you Ben. :cheers:
Jax wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 9:38 am

I have edited 1 Cor 4:6c and made the recommended correction pointed out by Ben.
Jax,

I assume by making the “recommended correction“, you mean that you are, at least for now, considering the phrase “not to go beyond what is written“ in 1 Corinthians 4:6 to be an interpolation.

In the link to page 104 that Ben provided, Strugnell suggests the phrase began as a marginal note that became incorporated into the text, but the author of the linked book (Roger S. Bosse) goes on to write on page 105 (Google Books not always providing that page, try hitting the magnify button) ---

“Despite his arguments, Strugnell’s conclusion must be rejected …” (p. 105)

What evidence leads you to think the phrase was a later addition? How strong do you consider evidence for interpolation here?

I’m not likely to get further involved in this discussion at this time, but I’m just curious about your methodology and thought process here.
Hi Robert, I wish that I were competent enough in koine and ancient literature to be able to evaluate the evidence and come to an informed conclusion. I am not. Therefore I must rely on the opinions of those that are. Which at this point are people like William O. Walker Jr and Ben C. Smith among a few others. For now, both people that I have mentioned feel that the phrase is an interpolation (or gloss if you will) and based on that I have removed it pending new evidence to the contrary.
Just for clarity, I myself am not committed to either option in this verse. I was just clarifying exactly what Walker meant when he listed 1 Corinthians 4.6c as a possible interpolation. (I am in a situation similar to yours, Jax: still trying to sort out what is original, what is not, and what the bounds of individual letters might be.)
ΤΙ ΕΣΤΙΝ ΑΛΗΘΕΙΑ

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Jax
Posts: 749
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Re: Deconstructed Letters of Paulos

Post by Jax » Sun Jul 28, 2019 1:35 pm

Ben C. Smith wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 12:44 pm
Jax wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 12:33 pm
robert j wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 11:16 am
Jax wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:14 pm
Ben C. Smith wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 8:09 pm


I believe what is meant by 1 Corinthians 4.6c is only the phrase "not to go beyond what is written," from a suggestion by John Strugnell:

6 But these things, brethren, I have figuratively applied to myself and Apollos for your sakes, so that you may learn by us not to exceed what is written, so that no one of you should become arrogant in behalf of one against the other. / 6 ταῦτα δέ, ἀδελφοί, μετεσχημάτισα εἰς ἐμαυτὸν καὶ Ἀπολλῶν δι᾽ ὑμᾶς, ἵνα ἐν ἡμῖν μάθητε τὸ μὴ ὑπὲρ ἃ γέγραπται, ἵνα μὴ εἷς ὑπὲρ τοῦ ἑνὸς φυσιοῦσθε κατὰ τοῦ ἑτέρου.

Right on. Thank you Ben. :cheers:
Jax wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 9:38 am

I have edited 1 Cor 4:6c and made the recommended correction pointed out by Ben.
Jax,

I assume by making the “recommended correction“, you mean that you are, at least for now, considering the phrase “not to go beyond what is written“ in 1 Corinthians 4:6 to be an interpolation.

In the link to page 104 that Ben provided, Strugnell suggests the phrase began as a marginal note that became incorporated into the text, but the author of the linked book (Roger S. Bosse) goes on to write on page 105 (Google Books not always providing that page, try hitting the magnify button) ---

“Despite his arguments, Strugnell’s conclusion must be rejected …” (p. 105)

What evidence leads you to think the phrase was a later addition? How strong do you consider evidence for interpolation here?

I’m not likely to get further involved in this discussion at this time, but I’m just curious about your methodology and thought process here.
Hi Robert, I wish that I were competent enough in koine and ancient literature to be able to evaluate the evidence and come to an informed conclusion. I am not. Therefore I must rely on the opinions of those that are. Which at this point are people like William O. Walker Jr and Ben C. Smith among a few others. For now, both people that I have mentioned feel that the phrase is an interpolation (or gloss if you will) and based on that I have removed it pending new evidence to the contrary.
Just for clarity, I myself am not committed to either option in this verse. I was just clarifying exactly what Walker meant when he listed 1 Corinthians 4.6c as a possible interpolation. (I am in a situation similar to yours, Jax: still trying to sort out what is original, what is not, and what the bounds of individual letters might be.)
Nor am I. I have no dog in the fight one way or the other. Just want to get as close as I can to original content. The fact that you are trying to do this as well is very helpful to me as you seem very honest and sincere and don't have an agenda that I can see.

I look forward to working this out (as best as can be expected anyway) with you.

Qapla’

Lane

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Jax
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Re: Deconstructed Letters of Paulos

Post by Jax » Thu Aug 15, 2019 1:50 pm

Finally! Romans through chapter 15 (with misgivings about chapter 15)

Romans 1:1 - 15:33 Without 1:18-2:29 and 3:12-18 and 3:24-26 and 4 and 5:1 and 5:6-7 and 5:12-21 and 6:13 and 6:17 and 6:19 and 7:6 and 7:25b-8:1 and 8:9-11 and 9-11 and 12:11 and 13:1-7 and 14:6 and 15:4

Note: Again, this is based on the World English Bible and adjusted when it conflicts with The New Testament by David Bentley Hart.

Enjoy. :)

Paul, a slave of Iesou Christou, called to be a messenger, set apart for the Announcement of God, which he promised before through his prophets in sacred writings, concerning his Son, who was born of the seed of Dauid according to the flesh, marked out to be the Son of God with power according to a spirit of holiness by the resurrection of the dead-Iesou Christou our Master, through whom we received the gift and a mission to consent to faith among all the nations, for his name's sake. Among whom you are also included, you who are called Iesou Christou's own. To all who are in Rome, beloved of God, called to be holy: gift to you and peace from God our Father and the Master Iesou Christou.

First, I thank my God through Iesou Christou for all of you, that your faithfulness is proclaimed throughout the cosmos. For God is my witness, whom I serve in my spirit in the Announcement of his Son, how unceasingly I make mention of you always in my prayers, requesting, if by any means now at length I may be prospered by the will of God to come to you. For I long to see you, that I may impart to you some spiritual gift, to the end you may be firm- that is, that I with you may be comforted in you, each of us by the other's faith, both yours and mine. I do not want you to be ignorant, brothers, that often I intended to come to you, and have been prevented so far, that I might gather some fruit among you also, even as among the rest of the Gentiles. I am debtor both to Hellesin and to barbarians, both to the wise and to the foolish. So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the Announcement to you also who are in Rome. Because I am not ashamed of the Announcement of the Christou, for it is the power of God to salvation to everyone having faith; to the Ioudaio first, and also to the Helleni. For therein is revealed a righteousness of God from faith to faith. As has been written, "But the righteous shall live by faithfulness."

Then what advantage does the Ioudaiou have? Or what is the profit of circumcision? Much in every way! Because first of all, that they were entrusted with the oracles of God. For what if some were unfaithful, will their lack of faithfulness annul the faithfulness of God? Let it not be so! But, let God be found true, but every man a liar. As it is written, "That you might be justified in your words, And might prevail when you come into judgment." But if our unrighteousness commends the righteousness of God, what will we say? Is God unrighteous who inflicts wrath? I speak like men do. Let it not be so! For then how will God judge the cosmos? For if the truth of God through my lie abounded to his glory, why am I also still judged as a sinner? Why not (as we are slanderously reported, and as some affirm that we say), "Let us do evil, that good may come?" Those who say so are justly condemned. What then? Are we better than they? No, in no way. For we previously charged both Ioudaiou and Hellenos, that they are all under sin. As it is written, "There is no one righteous. No, not one. There is no one who understands. There is no one who seeks after God.
Now we know that whatever things the Law says, it speaks to those who are under the Law, that every mouth may be closed, and all the cosmos may be brought under the judgment of God. Because by the works of the Law, no flesh will be justified in his sight. For through the Law comes the knowledge of sin.
But now apart from the Law, the righteousness of God has been revealed, being testified by the Law and the prophets, and by the faithfulness of Iesou Christou, God’s justice is for everyone keeping faith For there is no distinction, for all have sinned, and fall short of the glory of God; where then is the boasting? It is excluded. By what manner of law? Of observances? No, but by a law of faith. For we maintain therefore that a man is justified by faith apart from the works of the Law. Or is God the God of Ioudaiou only? Isn't he the God of Gentiles also? Yes, of Gentiles also, if it is so that God is one. He will justify the circumcised by faith, and the uncircumcised through faith. Do we then make the Law of no effect through faith? Let it not be so! No, we establish it, through whom we also have our access by faithfulness into this gift in which we stand, and boast on the glory of God- Not only that, but we also boast in afflictions, knowing that afflictions bring about endurance; and endurance, proven character; and proven character, hope: and hope doesn't disappoint us, because God's love has been poured out into our hearts through a Holy Spirit which has been given to us. But God commends his own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, the Christou died on our behalf. So much the more then, being vindicated by his blood, be saved from the indignation. For if, being enemies, we were reconciled to God through the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we will be saved by his life. Not only that, but we also rejoice in God through our Master Iesou Christou, through whom we have now received reconciliation.

What will we say then? Should we continue in sin, that grace might abound? Let it not be so! We who have died to sin, how could we live in it any longer? Or don't you know that all we who were baptized into the Christou Iesou were baptized into his death? We were buried therefore with him through baptism to death, that just like the Christou was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we also might walk in newness of life. For if we have become united with him in the likeness of his death, we will also be part of the resurrection; knowing this, that our old man was co-crucified, in order that the body of sin might be destroyed so that we should no longer be enslaved to sin. For he who has died has been freed from sin. And, if we died with the Christou, we have faith that we will also live together with him; knowing that the Christou, being raised from the dead, dies no more: his death no longer dominates. For the death that he died, he died to sin once and for all; but in that he lives he lives to God. Thus also consider yourselves also to be dead to sin, but alive to God in the Christou Iesou.
Therefore don't let sin reign in your mortal body, that you should obey it in its lusts. For sin will not have dominion over you. For you are not under law, but under grace. What then? Should we sin, because we are not under Law, but under grace? Let it not be so! Don't you know that to whom you present yourselves as servants to obedience, his servants you are whom you obey; whether of sin to death, or of obedience to righteousness? Being made free from sin, you became servants of righteousness. For when you were slaves of sin, you were free from righteousness. What fruition then did you have at that time? In which things are you now ashamed? For the end of those things is death. But now, being made free from sin, and having become slaves to God, you have your fruition, for the sake of sanctification, and the end is life in the Age. For the wages of sin are death, but the free gift of God is the life of the Age in the Christou Iesou, our Master.

Or don't you know, brothers (for I speak to men who know the Law), that the Law has dominion over a man for as long as he lives? For the woman that has a husband is bound by law to the husband while he
lives, but if the husband dies, she is discharged from the Law of the husband. So then if, while the husband lives, she is joined to another man, she would be called an adulteress. But if the husband dies, she is free from the Law, so that she is no adulteress, though she is joined to another man. Therefore, my brothers, you also were made dead to the Law through the body of the Christou, that you would be joined to another, to him who was raised from the dead, that we might bear fruit for God. For when we were in the flesh, the sinful passions which were through the Law, worked in our members to bearing fruit for death.

What will we say then? Is the Law sin? Let it not be so! I did not known sin except through Law; For I wouldn't have known coveting, unless the Law had said, "You shall not covet." But sin, finding occasion through the commandment, produced in me all kinds of coveting. For apart from the Law, sin is dead. I was alive apart from the Law once, but when the commandment came, sin revived, and I died. The commandment, which was to life, this I found to be to death; for sin, finding occasion through the commandment, deceived me, and through it killed me. So that the Law is holy, and the commandment holy, and righteous, and good. Did then that which is good become death to me? Let it not be so! But sin, that it might be shown to be sin, by working death to me through that which is good; that through the commandment sin might become exceeding sinful. For we know that the Law is spiritual, but I am fleshly, having been sold in subjection to sin. For I don't know what I accomplish; For I don't practice what I desire to do; but what I hate, that I do. But if what I don't desire, that I do, I consent to the Law that it is good. So now it is no more I that do it, but sin which dwells in me.
For I know that in me, that is, in my flesh, dwells no good thing. For desire is present with me, but I don't find it doing that which is good. For the good which I desire, I don't do; but the evil which I don't desire, that I practice. But if what I don't desire, that I do, it is no more I that do it, but sin which dwells in me. I find then the Law, that, to me, while I desire to do good, evil is present. For I delight in God's Law after the inward man, but I see a different law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity under the law of sin which is in my members. I am a man in torment! - who will deliver me out of the body of this death? I thank God for the Law of the Spirit of life in the Christou Iesou that made me free from the Law of sin and death. For what the Law couldn't do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God, sending his own Son in a sembalance of the flesh of sin and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh; that the ordinance of the Law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to Spirit. For those who are according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who are after the Spirit, the things of the Spirit.
For the mental inclination of the flesh is death, but the mental inclination of the Spirit is life and peace; hence the mental inclination of the flesh is hostile towards God; for it is not subject to God's Law, neither indeed can it be, for those who are in the flesh can't be pleaseing to God.
So then, brothers, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh. For if you live after the flesh, you must die; but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live. For as many are led by God’s Spirit, these are God’s sons. For you didn't receive again a spirit of slavery to fear, but rather received a spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, "Abba! Father!" The Spirit itself testifies with our spirit that we are children of God; and if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with the Christou; since we co-suffer in order that we may be co-glorified. For I consider that the sufferings of this present time of no worth before the coming glory which will be revealed to us. For the creation waits with eager expectation for the sons of God to be revealed.
For creation was made subordinate to pointlessness, not of its own will but because of the one who subordinated it, in hope that the creation itself also will be liberated from decay into the freedom of the glory of God’s children. For we know that all creation groans and travails in birth pangs together until this moment. Not only this, but ourselves also, having the firstfruits of the Spirit, groan within ourselves, anxiously awaiting adoption, emancipation of our body. For we were saved in hope, but hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for that which he sees? But if we hope for that which we don't see, we anticipate by perseverance. In the same way, the Spirit also helps our weaknesses, for we don't know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself makes intercession for us with groanings which can't be uttered, and he who searches out the heart knows what the Spirit's mind is, because he makes intercession for the holy ones according to God. And we know that all things work together for good for those who love God, to those who are called according to a purpose. For whom he foreknew, he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, so that he might be the firstborn among many brothers. Whom he foreordained, them he also called. Whom he called, them he then proved righteous. Whom he proved righteous, them he also glorified.
What then will we say about these things? If God is for us, who can be against us? He who didn't spare his own Son, but delivered him over on behalf of us all, how would he not also with him freely give us all things? Who could bring a charge against God's chosen ones? It is God who vindicates. Who is the one who condemns? The Christou, Iesou? He who died- or, rather, who was raised from the dead, who is at the right hand of God, who also intercedes for us?
Who will separate us from the love of the Christou? Affliction, or anguish, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As has been written: "For your sake we are killed all day long. We were accounted as sheep for the slaughter." Rather, in all these things, we more than conquer through the one who has loved us. For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor Messengers, nor Archons, nor things present, nor things to come, nor Powers, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in the Christou Iesou our Master.

Therefore I beg you, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies a living, holy, acceptable sacrifice to God, your rational worship. Don't be fashioned according to this age, but be transformed by the renewal of the intellect, so that you may test what is the good and acceptable and perfect will of God.
For I say, through the gift that was given me, to everyone among you, not to think yourself more highly than you ought to think; but to think reasonably, as God has apportioned to each person a measure of faithfulness. For just as we have many members in one body, and all the members don't have the same function, so we, who are many, are one body in the Christou, and individually members one of another.
And having differing gifts according to the gift that was given to us: if prophecy, let us prophesy according to the proportion of our faithfulness; or service, let us give ourselves to service; or who teaches, to teaching; or who exhorts, to exhorting: one who gives, in liberality; one who directs, with diligence; one who shows mercy, with cheerfulness.
Love is without hypocrisy. Abhorring that which is evil, clinging to that which is good. In love of the brothers be tenderly affectionate one to another; in honor preferring one another; rejoicing in hope; enduring in affliction; persevering in prayer, providing for the needs of the holy ones; given to hospitality. Bless those who persecute; bless, and don't curse. Rejoice with those who rejoice. Weep with those who weep. Be of the same mind one toward another. Don't set your mind on high things, but associate with the humble. Don't be wise in your own conceits. Repay no one evil for evil. Respect what is honorable in the sight of all men. If it is possible, as much as it is up to you, be at peace with all human beings. Don't seek revenge yourselves, beloved, but yield place before anger. For it is written, "The exacting of justice is mine, I will repay, says the Master." But rather "If your enemy is hungry, feed him. If he is thirsty, give him a drink. For in doing so, you will heap coals of fire on his head." Don't be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.

Owe no one anything, except to love one another; for he who loves the other has fulfilled the Law. For the commandments, "You shall not commit adultery," "You shall not murder," "You shall not steal," "You shall not give false testimony," "You shall not covet," and whatever other commandments there are, are all summed up in this saying, namely, "You shall love your neighbor as yourself."
Love doesn't harm the neighbor. Love therefore is the full totality of the Law. This, knowing the time, that it is already time for you to awake out of sleep, for salvation is now nearer to us than when we first came to faith. The night is far advanced, and the day has drawn near. Let's therefore throw off the works of darkness, and let's put on the armaments of the light. Let us walk properly, as in the day; not in reveling and drunkenness, not in sexual promiscuity and lustful acts, and not in strife and jealousy. But put on the Master Iesou Christou, and make no provision for the flesh, for its lusts.

Welcome him who is weak in faith, not in order to reach verdicts on disputes. One man has faith to eat all things, but he who is weak eats vegetables. Don't let him who eats despise him who doesn't eat. Don't let him who doesn't eat judge him who eats. Who are you who judge another’s house-servant? To his own Master he stands or falls. He will be made to stand or fall by his own master; and he shal stand because that lord is able to make him stand. One man esteems one day above another. Another esteems every day alike. Let each man be fully assured in his own mind. For none of us lives for himself, and none dies for himself. For if we live, we live for the Master. Or if we die, we die for the Master. If therefore we live or die, we are the Master's. For to this end the Christou died and lived again, that he might be Master of both the dead and the living. And why do you judge your brother? Or you again, why do you have contempt for your brother? For we will all stand before God’s judgment seat. For it is written, "'As I live,' says the Master, 'to me every knee will bow. Every tongue will praise God.'"
So then each one of us will give account of himself to God.

Therefore Let's not judge one another any more, but judge this rather, that no man put a stumbling block in his brother's way, or an occasion of tripping. I know, and am persuaded in the Master, that nothing is unclean of itself; except that to him who considers anything to be unclean, to him it is
unclean. Yet if because of food your brother is grieved, you walk no longer in love. Then don't let your good be blasphmed by you. For the kingdom of God is not eating and drinking, but righteousness, peace, and joy in a holy spirit. For he who slaves for the Christou in these things is acceptable to God and approved by men. So then, let us follow after things which make for peace, and things whereby we may build one another up. Don't overthrow God's work for food's sake. All things indeed are clean, however it is evil for that man who creates a stumbling block by eating. It is good not to eat meat, drink wine nor do anything by which your brother stumbles, is offended, or is made weak. Do you have faith? Have it to yourself before God. Happy is he who doesn't judge himself in that which he approves. But he who doubts is condemned if he eats, because it isn't of faithfulness; and whatever is not of faithfulness is sin.

Now we who are strong ought to bear the weaknesses of the weak, and not to please ourselves. Let each of us please his neighbor for that which is good, to be building him up. For Christou also didn't please himself. But, as it is written, "The reproaches of those who reproached you fell on me." Now the God of endurance and of consolation grant you to be of the same mind one with another according to Christou Iesou, that with one accord you may with one mouth glorify the God and Father of our Master Iesou Christou.
Therefore receive one another, even as Christou also received you, to the glory of God. Now I say that Christou has been made a servant of the circumcision on behalf of God’s truth, that he might confirm the promises of to the fathers, so that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy. As it is written, "Therefore will I give praise to you among the Gentiles, And sing psalms to your name." Again it says, "Rejoice, you Gentiles, with his people." Again, "Praise the Master, all you Gentiles! Let all the peoples sing him praises." Again, Esaias says, "There will be the root of Iessai, He who arises to rule over the Gentiles; On him will the Gentiles hope." And may the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that you may abound in hope, in the power of a Holy Spirit.
I myself am also persuaded about you, my brothers, that you yourselves are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, able also to admonish one another. And I write the more boldly to you in some measure, as putting you again in memory, because of the gift that was given to me by God, that I should be a servant of Christou Iesou to the Gentiles, making the sacrifice of God’s Announcement, that the offering up of the Gentiles might be made acceptable, being consecrated by a Holy Spirit. I have therefore my boasting in Christou Iesou in things pertaining to God. For I will not dare to speak of any things except those which Christou worked through me, for the obedience of the Gentiles, by word and deed, in the power of signs and wonders, in the power of God's Spirit; so that from Ierousalem, and around as far as to Illyrikou, I have fully preached the Announcement of Christou; yes, making it my aim so to preach the Announcement, not where Christou was already named, that I might not build on another man's foundation. But, as it is written, "They will see, to whom no news of him came. They who haven't heard will understand." Therefore also I was hindered these many times from coming to you, but now, no longer having any place in these regions, and having these many years a longing to come to you, whenever I journey to Spanian, I will come to you. For I hope to see you on my journey, and to be helped on my way there by you, if I may be replenished by you first. But now, I say, I am going to Ierousalem, serving to the holy ones. For it has been the good pleasure of Makedonia and Achaia to make a certain contribution for the poor among the holy ones who are at Ierousalem. Yes, it has been their good pleasure, and they are their debtors. For if the Gentiles have been made partakers of their spiritual things, they owe it to them also to serve them in fleshly things. When therefore I have accomplished this, and have delivered to them these fruits under seal, I will go on by you to Spanian.
I know that, when I come to you, I will come in the fullness of the blessing of Christ.

Now I beg you, brothers, by our Master Iesou Christou, and by the love of the Spirit, that you strive together with me in your prayers to God for me, that I may be delivered from those who are distrustful in Ioudaia, and that my service which I have for Ierousalem may be acceptable to the holy ones; that I may come to you in joy through the will of God, and together with you, find rest. And the God of peace be with you all. Amen.

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Jax
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Re: Deconstructed Letters of Paulos

Post by Jax » Thu Aug 15, 2019 2:08 pm

OK. Final score so far.

1: Galatians. Without 2:7-8

2: 1 Corinthians 1:1-4:21. Without 1:2 and 2:6-16 and 4:6c and 4:17
3: 1 Corinthians 5:1-6:11.
4: 1 Corinthians 6:12- 8:13. Without 6:14 and 7:29-31
5: 1 Corinthians 9.
6: 1 Corinthians 10:23-16:24. Without 11:3-16 and 11:23-28 and 12:31b-14:1a and 14:33b-35 and 15:3-11 and 15:21-22 and 15:31b and 15:44b-48 and 15:56

7: 2 Corinthians 1:1-2:13 and 7:5-16.
8: 2 Corinthians 2:14-7:4. Without 6:14-7:1
9: 2 Corinthians 8:1-24.
10: 2 Corinthians 9:1-15.
11: 2 Corinthians 10-13.

12: 1 Thessalonians 2:17-3:13. Without 2:13-16
13: 1 Thessalonians 1:1-2:12 and 4:9-5:28. Without 4:10b-12 and 4:18-5:22 and 5:27

14: Philippians 1:1-3:1. Without 2:5-11
15: Philippians 3:2-4:9.
16: Philippians 4:10-23.

17: Romans 1:1-15:33 Without 1:18-2:29 and 3:12-18 and 3:24-26 and 4 and 5:1 and 5:6-7 and 5:12-21 and 6:13 and 6:17 and 6:19 and 7:6 and 7:25b-8:1 and 8:9-11 and 9-11 and 12:11 and 13:1-7 and 14:6 and 15:4

Romans 4 as a possible later interpolation?

Romans 9-11 as a possible later interpolation?

Romans 16? Without 16:5 and 16:25-27

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Jax
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Re: Deconstructed Letters of Paulos

Post by Jax » Wed Aug 21, 2019 12:30 pm

For ease of use and easy printing I have uploaded this PDF
Paul's Letters 1.pdf
(138.37 KiB) Downloaded 117 times

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