Born of a woman (as an idiomatic expression).

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Ben C. Smith
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Re: Born of a woman (as an idiomatic expression).

Post by Ben C. Smith » Sat Oct 07, 2017 7:57 pm

spin wrote:
Sat Oct 07, 2017 7:33 pm
Yo Ben C.! I don't think that "born of a woman" is idiomatic. I think it is a culturally laden phrase, somewhat like "born of immigrant parents" is in American dream narratives. Do we have the notion of "born of a woman" in the Judeo-Christian tradition where it does not refer to a Jewish mother?
Well, that is an interesting point. The phrase seems to be used so generically at times, though, that I cannot tell whether Jewishness is in view rather than just humanness. 1QS 11.21a, for example: "As what shall one born of woman be considered in your presence?" Is this not an issue of human versus deity?
To read the phrase to mean anything non-literal seems to me to be eisegetical.
Oh, I agree.
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spin
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Re: Born of a woman (as an idiomatic expression).

Post by spin » Sat Oct 07, 2017 8:31 pm

Ben C. Smith wrote:
Sat Oct 07, 2017 7:57 pm
1QS 11.21a, for example: "As what shall one born of woman be considered in your presence?" Is this not an issue of human versus deity?
It could be. I don't know how wide the notion of "born of a woman" could have been. If being born of a Jewish woman can be reduced to the equivalent of being born of a woman generally, I'd guess that the distinction would not be discernable in the context. But that's just a guess and you may be right.
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