Why Stephen and Peter are called Martyrs

Discussion about the New Testament, apocrypha, gnostics, church fathers, Christian origins, historical Jesus or otherwise, etc.
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Giuseppe
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Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:37 am
Location: Vicenza (Italy)

Why Stephen and Peter are called Martyrs

Post by Giuseppe » Mon Sep 10, 2018 7:13 am

Acts 7:54-60:

54 When the members of the Sanhedrin heard this, they were furious and gnashed their teeth at him. 55 But Stephen, full of the Holy Spirit, looked up to heaven and saw the glory of God, and Jesus standing at the right hand of God. 56 “Look,” he said, “I see heaven open and the Son of Man standing at the right hand of God.”
57 At this they covered their ears and, yelling at the top of their voices, they all rushed at him, 58 dragged him out of the city and began to stone him. Meanwhile, the witnesses laid their coats at the feet of a young man named Saul.
59 While they were stoning him, Stephen prayed, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” 60 Then he fell on his knees and cried out, “Lord, do not hold this sin against them.” When he had said this, he fell asleep.

1Clem 5:4
There was Peter who by reason of unrighteous jealousy endured not one
not one but many labors, and thus having borne his testimony [martyrdom] went to
his appointed place of glory.

Who saw in hallucinations the Lord Jesus was called 'martyr', and only after the term 'martyr' was equivalent to 'persecuted as Christian'.

Only later the term was used to mean 'persecuted Christians', to sell the term as 'evidence' of the truth of the Christian religio.

Therefore 1 Clement is not evidence of the persecution of Peter in Rome.
Nihil enim in speciem fallacius est quam prava religio. -Liv. xxxix. 16.

Giuseppe
Posts: 4508
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:37 am
Location: Vicenza (Italy)

Re: Why Stephen and Peter are called Martyrs

Post by Giuseppe » Mon Sep 10, 2018 7:40 am

Note the irony of the History: what was evidence against the historicity of Jesus (the being Peter and/or Paup people who 'saw' - and in this sense and this sense alone they were 'martyrs' - of the Risen Lord) becomes later presumed propagandistic 'evidence' pro-historicity: their death ('martyrdom') for a ghost.
Nihil enim in speciem fallacius est quam prava religio. -Liv. xxxix. 16.

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