And if salt loses its head...

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Charles Wilson
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Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2014 8:13 am

And if salt loses its head...

Post by Charles Wilson » Thu Nov 29, 2018 3:22 pm

Another, out of the blue appearance of something not expected...

Acts 6: 5 - 6 (RSV):

[5] And what they said pleased the whole multitude, and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and of the Holy Spirit, and Philip, and Proch'orus, and Nica'nor, and Ti'mon, and Par'menas, and Nicola'us, a proselyte of Antioch.
[6] These they set before the apostles, and they prayed and laid their hands upon them.

I believe strongly that this entire section is History Rewritten - Roman History to be exact. The "Little Clue" that is left for all to see is "Nicholas, Hero of Antioch" (various wordings OK.).

Who was "Hero of Antioch?

That would be Octavian => Augustus, who championed that city. This is an inverted List of Caesars, after the not-mentioned Julius.
[Edit: Remember, Julius Caesar was not a Caesar. The first "Caesar" was Augustus.]
That would make Stephen a cipher for one Frugi Piso, the four day Emperor.

Now, I've written about this and if anyone has followed the Trail I found, you note that I believe that the Stephen mentioned in verse 5 is not the Stephen in verse 15. "Stephen" is a composite character.

Acts 6: 15; 7: 58 - 60 (RSV):

[15] And gazing at him, all who sat in the council saw that his face was like the face of an angel.
...
[58] Then they cast him out of the city and stoned him; and the witnesses laid down their garments at the feet of a young man named Saul.
[59] And as they were stoning Stephen, he prayed, "Lord Jesus, receive my spirit."
[60] And he knelt down and cried with a loud voice, "Lord, do not hold this sin against them." And when he had said this, he fell asleep.

This person is Calpurnius Galerianus, seen in Tacitus, Histories, Book 4:

"The murder of Calpurnius Galerianus caused the utmost consternation. He was a son of Caius Piso, and had done nothing, but a noble name and his own youthful beauty made him the theme of common talk; and while the country was still unquiet and delighted in novel topics, there were persons who associated him with idle rumours of Imperial honours. By order of Mucianus he was surrounded with a guard of soldiers. Lest his execution in the capital should excite too much notice, they conducted him to the fortieth milestone from Rome on the Appian Road, and there put him to death by opening his veins..."

This Stephen was stoned in Acts. In Histories, his veins are opened. In both citations, the Subject is taken outside the city and murdered. I believe that Saul/Paul is Mucianus.

As I always ask, "Do you fall asleep when you are stoned?"

So, let's move on a bit. In John. we find more info than we get in the Synoptics. In particular, we find that the soudarian, (Latin! Tip of the hat to J. Atwill.), the head bandages, are separated from the body bandages suggesting that in John, the Interregnum is played out at the Tomb. "Soudarian" => Galba is decapitated. Wounded in his side with blood and water flowing out => Otho, at the Po River, when he commits suicide.

Vitellius deserves special scorn. He had homosexual relations with Asiaticus:

Suetonius, 12 Caesars, "Vitellius":

"[Vitellius] regulated the greater part of his rule wholly according to the advice and whims of the commonest of actors and chariot-drivers, and in particular of his freedman Asiaticus. This fellow had immoral relations with Vitellius in his youth, but later grew weary of him and ran away. When Vitellius came upon him selling posca at Puteoli, he put him in irons, but at once freed him again and made him his favourite..."

"Posca" was a mixture of water and vinegar, "The Drink of the Legions". What an Ad Campaign that must have been. Thus, we find the meaning of the vinegar on a sponge on the end of a hyssop stick, as found in the Gospels.

So this is all wrapped up in a pretty box with a pretty little bow...until now. Let's review how Suetonius describes the Death of Galba:

He was killed beside the Lake of Curtius and was left lying just as he was, until a common soldier, returning from a distribution of grain, threw down his load and cut off the head. Then, since there was no hair by which to grasp it, he put it under his robe, but later thrust his thumb into the mouth and so carried it to Otho. He handed it over to his servants and camp-followers, who set it on a lance and paraded it about the camp with jeers, crying out from time to time, "Galba, thou Cupid, exult in thy vigour!" The special reason for this saucy jest was, that the report had gone abroad a few days before, that when someone had congratulated him on still looking young and vigorous, he replied:

"As yet my strength is unimpaired."

From these it was bought by a freedman of Patrobius Neronianus for a hundred pieces of gold and thrown aside in the place where his patron had been executed by Galba's order. At last, however, his steward Argivus consigned it to the tomb with the rest of the body in Galba's private gardens on the Aurelian Road..."

This is why the soudarian bandages are separated from the body bandages in John.

Wait! What if there was another beheading? Didn't someone else get their head chopped off?
Yes. Frugi Piso, the Four Day Emperor.

Tacitus, Histories, Book 1:

"...There, not indeed through the sanctity of the place or its worship, but through the obscurity of his hiding-place, he [Piso] obtained a respite from instant destruction, till there came, by Otho's direction and specially eager to slay him, Sulpicius Florus, of the British auxiliary infantry, to whom Galba had lately given the citizenship, and Statius Murcus, one of the body-guard. Piso was dragged out by these men and slaughtered in the entrance of the temple.

There was, we are told, no death of which Otho heard with greater joy, no head which he surveyed with so insatiable a gaze. Perhaps it was, that his mind was then for the first time relieved from all anxiety, and so had leisure to rejoice; perhaps there was with Galba something to recall departed majesty, with Vinius some thought of old friendship, which troubled with mournful images even that ruthless heart; Piso's death, as that of an enemy and a rival, he felt to be a right and lawful subject of rejoicing. The heads were fixed upon poles and carried about among the standards of the cohorts, close to the eagle of the legion, while those who had struck the blow, those who had been present, those who whether truly or falsely boasted of the act, as of some great and memorable achievement, vied in displaying their bloodstained hands..."

SO, WHAT?

From the ever politicized Wiki-P:

"Licinianus had married Verania Gemina, who came from a family of consular rank. Otho had afterwards surrendered Licinianus’ head to Verania, who had given Otho a large sum of money for it. Verania had buried Licinianus’ head together with his body in a tomb located on the Via Salaria..."

[Note: Pliny, Tactitus and Plutarch are involved here and, again, that supports the Theory that PtY and Tacitus had a great deal of input into the NT.]
https://books.google.com/books?id=ZT34_ ... so&f=false]

AND AGAIN, SO WHAT?

Verania Gemina gets Frugi's head and takes it to a tomb on the Via Salaria. What is the "Via Salaria"?

Wiki-P, "Via Salaria"

"The Via Salaria was an ancient Roman road in Italy.

"It eventually ran from Rome (from Porta Salaria of the Aurelian Walls) to Castrum Truentinum (Porto d'Ascoli) on the Adriatic coast, a distance of 242 km. The road also passed through Reate (Rieti) and Asculum (Ascoli Piceno). The Via Salaria owes its name to the Latin word for "salt", since it was the route by which the Sabines living nearer the Tyrrhenian sea came to fetch salt from the marshes at the mouth of the Tiber, the Campus Salinarum, while those nearer the Adriatic Sea used it to fetch it from production sites there. It was one of many ancient salt roads in Europe, and some historians... consider the Salaria and the trade in salt to have been the origin of the settlement of Rome."

Now, this is a long stretch (of road...) but it is suggestive of something:

Matthew 5: 13 (RSV):

[13] "You are the salt of the earth; but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trodden under foot by men.

[Edit Addition: Note the "Little Joke": "Men" may travel on foot just about anywhere but as time passes, they tend to travel on foot by way of roads. Here, by an old "Salt Road".]

For those of the Roman Thesis persuasion, this entire section points to a Minority Report concerning the Interregnum between the Julio-Claudians and the Flavians. Galba: Murdered and beheaded. Frugi Piso: Murdered and beheaded. Otho: Suicide. Vitellius: murdered. Galerianus: Murdered. Central Player in all of this: Mucianus.

I still believe the arrangement of those who are crucified in John is a summary of the Caesars who lived and died before the Flavians. There is still, it appears, some more History to "Divine".

CW
Last edited by Charles Wilson on Fri Nov 30, 2018 12:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Charles Wilson
Posts: 1160
Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2014 8:13 am

Re: And if salt loses its head...

Post by Charles Wilson » Thu Nov 29, 2018 7:53 pm

When something like this hits me, I don't know when it will end. I didn't even "get" the "Little Joke" until after I had Posted. I may yet rewrite the next-to-last paragraph since, though Mucianus was Central to it all, he was not the Cause of it all. Something is still "out there".

Notice, however, what the above brings about: The sections of Acts 6, 7 and 8 appear to me to have been constructed around a composite character. Stephen is Frugi Piso at the start and Galerianus at the end. The main section of Chapter 7 deserves intense scrutiny on its own. The point, however, is that there appears to have been no reason for Stephen Martyr to have been composite - until now.

There appears to have been a wing of the Roman Court that favored the Galba - Piso Line, whether by the Piso Line (After Nero, not doin' too good...) or simply the manner of Succession as given by Galba. Or maybe the non-Hellenistic Priesthood thought they might have a friend in Piso. Vespasian gave Allegiance to Otho but that was it. Otho had Piso beheaded. Mucianus had Galerianus taken out to the fortieth mile and had his veins opened and for no reason. Why were they written about in Acts in this manner? For what reason?

Whatever the reason, the character Stephen Martyr can now be seen as composite. Otho is a Main Character since his death is a Main Sequence in the Empty Tomb Motif. Acts is most certainly tied to Mucianus as a Main Character, along with the 12th Legion.

Why are these 2 Scenarios combined into one Scene with "Stephen" as the focus?

Charles Wilson
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Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2014 8:13 am

Re: And if salt loses its head...

Post by Charles Wilson » Fri Nov 30, 2018 8:19 pm

Tacitus, Histories, Book 1:

"We are told that Galba, taking hold of Piso's hand, spoke to this effect: "If I were a private man, and were now adopting you by the Act of the Curiae before the Pontiffs, as our custom is, it would be a high honour to me to introduce into my family a descendant of Cn. Pompeius and M. Crassus; it would be a distinction to you to add to the nobility of your race the honours of the Sulpician and Lutatian houses. As it is, I, who have been called to the throne by the unanimous consent of gods and men, am moved by your splendid endowments and by my own patriotism to offer to you, a man of peace, that power, for which our ancestors fought, and which I myself obtained by war. I am following the precedent of the Divine Augustus, who placed on an eminence next to his own, first his nephew Marcellus, then his son-in-law Agrippa, afterwards his grandsons, and finally Tiberius Nero, his stepson. But Augustus looked for a successor in his own family, I look for one in the state...

"The choice which begins with us will be a substitute for freedom. Now that the family of the Julii and the Claudii has come to an end, adoption will discover the worthiest successor. To be begotten and born of a princely race is a mere accident, and is only valued as such. In adoption there is nothing that need bias the judgment, and if you wish to make a choice, an unanimous opinion points out the man. Let Nero be ever before your eyes, swollen with the pride of a long line of Caesars...

"...when men shall hear of your adoption I shall no longer be thought old, and this is the only objection which is now made against me. Nero will always be regretted by the thoroughly depraved; it is for you and me to take care, that he be not regretted also by the good. To prolong such advice, suits not this occasion, and all my purpose is fulfilled if I have made a good choice in you. The most practical and the shortest method of distinguishing between good and bad measures, is to think what you yourself would or would not like under another emperor. It is not here, as it is among nations despotically ruled, that there is a distinct governing family, while all the rest are slaves. You have to reign over men who cannot bear either absolute slavery or absolute freedom." This, with more to the same effect, was said by Galba; he spoke to Piso as if he were creating an emperor; the others addressed him as if he were an emperor already.

"The 10th of January was a gloomy, stormy day, unusually disturbed by thunder, lightning, and all bad omens from heaven. Though this had from ancient time been made a reason for dissolving an assembly, it did not deter Galba from proceeding to the camp; either because he despised such things as being mere matters of chance, or because the decrees of fate, though they be foreshewn, are not escaped. Addressing a crowded assembly of the soldiers he announced, with imperial brevity, that he adopted Piso, following the precedent of the Divine Augustus, and the military custom by which a soldier chooses his comrade..."

This section is most interesting. Galba is trying to effect a Grand Reorientation in the manner of Regime Change in the Empire. It starts with Augustus - The Divine Augustus - and takes his labors of finding a Successor within the family and begins to point the empire into a new direction. The use of Adoption would allow anyone to be offered should the current Ruler...ummm...not be able to fulfill Familial Duties. Of course, there has to be a check on the process. AND LO! "...if you wish to make a choice, an unanimous opinion points out the man".

That "unanimous opinion" is the unanimous opinion of the Military, no surprise. Considering what is to happen in mere hours, this is incredibly naive but it certainly made an impression on someone. Again:

Acts 6: 2 - 5 (RSV):

[2] And the twelve summoned the body of the disciples and said, "It is not right that we should give up preaching the word of God to serve tables.
[3] Therefore, brethren, pick out from among you seven men of good repute, full of the Spirit and of wisdom, whom we may appoint to this duty.
[4] But we will devote ourselves to prayer and to the ministry of the word."
[5] And what they said pleased the whole multitude, and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and of the Holy Spirit, and

Philip, and
Proch'orus, and
Nica'nor, and
Ti'mon, and
Par'menas, and
Nicola'us, a proselyte of Antioch.

To the Caesars, the "Serving of tables".
To the Legions, the "Ministering of the Word" (and the Right of Approval of the next offered Caesar).

CW

Charles Wilson
Posts: 1160
Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2014 8:13 am

Re: And if salt loses its head...

Post by Charles Wilson » Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:09 am

Let's continue this for a bit. If the Roman Thesis is True in some manner, then there must have been real people in real time writing the Stories. There also appear different variations that were composed and these versions were fought over and approved and disapproved by certain "Project Leaders" who could order changes in the texts. These changes are not always consistent with what came before. The "Baptism of John" is barely written when it is replaced by the "Baptism of the Holy Spirit", f'rinstance.

This points to one version of the Roman Thesis with Vespasian => "The Father", Titus => "The Son" and Domitian => "The Holy Spirit". It should be seen that part of this process is involved with "Who held the pen last?" Domitian appears to want to change the direction of the Deified Titus Motif to a Deified Domitian-and-he's-the-last-one Motif but the Damnatio aspect could not have been foreseen by Domitian. The "Holy Spirit" is given by those of the Project who carried on after Domitian was killed.

The remaining documents were fought over. Not all of the documents were "cleansed" of the Retrograde Material completely.
Tacitus, Histories, Book 1 wrote:Addressing a crowded assembly of the soldiers he [Galba] announced, with imperial brevity, that he adopted Piso, following the precedent of the Divine Augustus, and the military custom by which a soldier chooses his comrade
The assertion is made here that this is Symbolized in a few short words as "... Nicola'us, a proselyte of Antioch" in Acts. In fact, the assertion of "Adoption, with Miltary Approval" is fairly well stated explicitly:

Acts 6: 3 (RSV):

[3] Therefore, brethren, pick out from among you seven men of good repute, full of the Spirit and of wisdom, whom we may appoint to this duty.

This faction is on one side. I believe the evidence supports the position that this faction found favor with many, probably Roman and Jew alike.
Alas, Reality impinges in a most painful manner when the HOPE of stable Transition is crushed:

Matthew 5: 13 (RSV):

[13] "You are the salt of the earth; but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trodden under foot by men.

OK. FINE. What other faction vied for attention?

John 3: 16 (RSV):

[16] For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.
Galba wrote: Let Nero be ever before your eyes, swollen with the pride of a long line of Caesars...
The "Refutation" of Galba is contained in his own speech. "God" gave his only (begotten) son. (There is another "war" over the use of "begotten" but plz consult the literature for further edification). To examine the Roman Thesis here, we must consider the alternatives in the real world and I suggest you first look at Claudius.

Claudius had a "real son", Britannicus and an adopted son, Nero. Brit gets locked in the Romper Room while Nero gets to schmooze the Senate and gets elected Emperor. Not the Legions but the Senate.

Which faction won the argument? There was an offering of both a "Real" son and an "Adopted" son. Either one should have satisfied Galba's Analysis. Yet, according to Galba, the empire should have always kept Nero in mind. So quickly were the fatal choices offered. Not a real son nor an adopted son but both. Judea gets road graded because of it, crushing those who had hoped for a conciliatory nod from the Roman rulers, who would be hated by the survivors. The Empire teeters toward destruction. The end of the Julio-Claudians is not consumed until the arrival of the Flavians

[16] For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.

Who believed in the "...only (begotten) son?" Titus, who reclined with Britannicus at table and sampled Brit's fare, which was poisoned, as the story goes. Titus was quite fond of Brit and, after Titus recovered, made a golden statue of Brit. Titus survived and obtained "Eternal Life" by becoming a Caesar.

The Succession Problem was not decided by Galba and it plagued the Empire for the centuries that followed. Galba's Plan, however, "inspired by Augustus", appealed to many:

[6] These they set before the apostles, and they prayed and laid their hands upon them.
[7] And the word of God increased; and the number of the disciples multiplied greatly in Jerusalem, and a great many of the priests were obedient to the faith.
[8]And Stephen, full of grace and power, did great wonders and signs among the people.

CW

Charles Wilson
Posts: 1160
Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2014 8:13 am

Re: And if salt loses its head...

Post by Charles Wilson » Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:39 pm

A most telling statement:

Suetonius, 12 Caesars, "Claudius":

"Britannicus was born on the twenty-second day of his reign and in his second consulship. When he was still very small, Claudius would often take him in his arms and commend him to the assembled soldiers, and to the people at the games, holding him in his lap or in his outstretched hands, and he would wish him happy auspices, joined by the applauding throng..."

Charles Wilson
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Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2014 8:13 am

Re: And if salt loses its head...

Post by Charles Wilson » Sun Dec 09, 2018 6:21 pm

Tacitus, Annals 12, 68 - 69 (Thayer):

68 Meanwhile, the senate was convened, and consuls and priests formulated their vows for the imperial safety, at a moment when the now lifeless body was being swathed in blankets and warming bandages, while the requisite measures were arranged for securing the accession of Nero. In the first place, Agrippina, heart-broken apparently and seeking to be comforted, held Britannicus to her breast, styled him the authentic portrait of his father, and, by this or the other device, precluded him from leaving his room. His sisters, Antonia and Octavia, she similarly detained. She had barred all avenues of approach with pickets, and ever and anon she issued notices that the emperor's indisposition was turning favourably: all to keep the troops in good hope, and to allow time for the advent of the auspicious moment insisted upon by the astrologers.

69 At last, at midday, on the thirteenth of October, the palace gates swung suddenly open, and Nero, with Burrus in attendance, passed out to the cohort, always on guard in conformity with the rules of the service. There, at a hint from the prefect, he was greeted with cheers and placed in a litter. Some of the men are said to have hesitated, looking back and inquiring:— "Where was Britannicus?" Then, as no lead to the contrary was forthcoming, they acquiesced in the choice presented to them: Nero was carried into the camp; and, after a few introductory words suited to the time, promised a donative on the same generous scale as that of his father, and was saluted as Imperator. The verdict of the troops was followed by the senatorial decrees; nor was any hesitation evinced in the provinces. Divine honours were voted to Claudius, and his funeral solemnities were celebrated precisely as those of the deified Augustus, Agrippina emulating the magnificence of her great-grandmother Livia. His will, however, was not read, lest the preference of the stepson to the son should leave a disquieting impression of injustice and invidiousness upon the mind of the common people.

We can see the lead-up to Galba's Solution. There is no "Unanimous Opinion" from the Military - "Some of the men are said to have hesitated, looking back and inquiring:— 'Where was Britannicus?'" The Senate has "been prepared" by Nero's mother Agrippina. There are other accounts of this. Galba reminds everyone to "Keep Nero in mind..." Yet, he could not postpone his own death - or the others - for a moment.

Galba is murdered and his head is reunited with his body at Galba's private garden, in a tomb on the Aurelian Road. Frugi Piso is murdered, and his head is reunited with his body at his tomb on the Salt Road, carried there by his wife, Verania Gemina. Perhaps this is the story of the composite Stephen Martyr: There will never be a Piso as Emperor on the Roman Throne. Mucianus will "Baptize" the Household of Stephanas.

1 Corinthians 1: 16 (RSV):

[16] (I did baptize also the household of Steph'anas. Beyond that, I do not know whether I baptized any one else.)

Otho dies by his own hand and his body is burned at an early moment. A small Mausoleum is built in Brixellum. When the troops seek out Verginius Rufus to proclaim him Emperor, he leaves out the back door.

It certainly is an "Empty Tomb". It marks the beginning Origins of the Roman Thesis.

CW

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