The Skeptical Critical Commentary - Gospel of Mark

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JoeWallack
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1:1-3 X-Curses - Jewish Bible Prophecy in GMark

Post by JoeWallack » Sat Mar 09, 2019 5:24 pm

JW:

Verse Explicit Source? Positive? About Jesus? Original? Commentary
1
2 Even as it is written in Isaiah the prophet, Behold, I send my messenger before thy face, Who shall prepare thy way.
3 The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Make ye ready the way of the Lord, Make his paths straight;
Yes Yes Yes No Note that for the verses in question the prophecy is relatively straight-forward. Source and words are explicit and it's positive and about Jesus. It's representative of subsequent Christianity.
7
6 And he said unto them, Well did Isaiah prophesy of you hypocrites, as it is written, This people honoreth me with their lips, But their heart is far from me.
7 But in vain do they worship me, Teaching [as their] doctrines the precepts of men.
Yes No No Yes Negative prophecy against The Pharisees. Prophecies in The Teaching & Healing Ministry are few and far between.
9
13 But I say unto you, that Elijah is come, and they have also done unto him whatsoever they would, even as it is written of him.
No No No Yes Negative prophecy against The Herodians.
11
17 And he taught, and said unto them, Is it not written, My house shall be called a house of prayer for all the nations? but ye have made it a den of robbers.
No No No Yes Negative prophecy against The Sadducees and Scribes.
12
10 Have ye not read even this scripture: The stone which the builders rejected, The same was made the head of the corner;
11 This was from the Lord, And it is marvellous in our eyes?
No No Yes Yes About as ironic as you get.
14
27 And Jesus saith unto them, All ye shall be offended: for it is written, I will smite the shepherd, and the sheep shall be scattered abroad.
No No No Yes Negative prophecy against the Disciples.
14
49 I was daily with you in the temple teaching, and ye took me not: but [this is done] that the scriptures might be fulfilled.
No No Yes Yes Ironic and negative.
15
28 [And the scripture was fulfilled, which saith, And he was reckoned with transgressors.]
No No Yes No Not original.

Generally the prophecies in the Teaching & Healing Ministry are few and far between while the prophecies in the Passion Ministry start
coming in faster than Trump's tweets. Our favorite author has also carefully allocated one such negative prophecy to each of his main fool groups:
  • Pharisees

    Herodians

    Sadducees

    Scribes

    Disciples
The following observations from the above support 1:1-3 as addition:
  • 1) Explicit prophecy from The Jewish Bible positively about Jesus during the Teaching & Healing Ministry is rarer than Gordon Gecko's interest in Annacott Steal.

    2) Most Markan prophecy claims are negative towards "Mark's" Jesus' supposed opposition.

    3) 1:1-3 looks anachronistic.


Joseph

Skeptical Textual Criticism

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JoeWallack
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1:1-3 - The GMark Claimed Source for John the Baptist being Prophesied Messenger/Elijah

Post by JoeWallack » Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:07 pm

JW:
1:1-3 Going MedGoodacre on the Internal Evidence:

Verse Literary Style of Source Nature of Claimed Source Messenger? Elijah? Commentary
1
2 Even as it is written in Isaiah the prophet, Behold, I send my messenger before thy face, Who shall prepare thy way.
3 The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Make ye ready the way of the Lord, Make his paths straight;
Editorial Prophesied in The Jewish Bible Yes No Note that everything here goes against GMark in general =
GMark is generally narrative but this is editorial.
GMark has few claims of Jewish Bible prophecy.
GMark is otherwise unclear about John the Baptist being the messenger for Jesus.
GMark is otherwise unclear about John the Baptist being Elijah.
6
14 And king Herod heard [thereof]; for his name had become known: and he said, John the Baptizer is risen from the dead, and therefore do these powers work in him.
Narrative N/A No No Herod thinks Jesus is John the Baptist.
The lost irony here is that even Herod believes in resurrections (while Jesus' own disciples don't).
8
27 And Jesus went forth, and his disciples, into the villages of Caesarea Philippi: and on the way he asked his disciples, saying unto them, Who do men say that I am?
28 And they told him, saying, John the Baptist; and others, Elijah; but others, One of the prophets.
Narrative N/A No Yes Others think that Jesus is John the Baptist and some think he is Elijah. Apparently no one thinks Jesus is the latter part of 1:2-3.
9
11 And they asked him, saying, [How is it] that the scribes say that Elijah must first come?
12 And he said unto them, Elijah indeed cometh first, and restoreth all things: and how is it written of the Son of man, that he should suffer many things and be set at nought?
13 But I say unto you, that Elijah is come, and they have also done unto him whatsoever they would, even as it is written of him.
Narrative Prophesied in The Jewish Bible Yes Yes Here is GMark's conclusion regarding John the Baptist as Messenger/Elijah and every component goes against 1:2-3 =
  • There is nothing in 1:2-3 about the Messenger suffering.
    There is nothing in 1:2-3 saying the Messenger would be Elijah.
    1:2-3 is primarily relational and not primarily sequential.
    1:2-3 is detailed in form not in summary.

Conclusion = Other than 1:2-3 all of GMark is ambiguous, unclear and misunderstood regarding the relationship of John the Baptist and Jesus. 1:2-3 is clear, in detail regarding the relationship. GMark's style is that relationships become clear to the reader via narrative. Editorial comment at the start obviously is for the reader so you could argue that in general relationships are made known to the reader in GMark (and not the/most/some characters). But 1:2-3 goes against how relationships are made known to the reader and also goes against Jesus' own concluding explanation of the relationship which is for the characters and especially the reader. If 1:2-3 doesn't fit (the rest of GMark) you have to acquit. As Raddimus explains You can't just say "Jesus fulfilled this prophecy!". You have to be sneaky. Again, 1:2-3 looks like it was written by subsequent Christianity which wanted to reduce the ambiguity of GMark's relationship between John the Baptist and Jesus (and this is just what we see in the subsequent Gospels).


Joseph

Skeptical Textual Criticism

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