Iao-Oannes

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Giuseppe
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Iao-Oannes

Post by Giuseppe » Mon May 06, 2019 7:35 am

Iao as Chrestos:
And Jesus cried out as he turned to the four corners of the world with his disciples, and they were all robed in linen garments, and he said: "iao, iao, iao." And he caused all his disciples to be clothed with linen garments

Pistis Sophia 1:370;353

Oannes, Oes, say the scholars, in Syriac means 'foreigner'.

John/Jochanan ("Grace of YHWH")

Iao-Oannes: Iao the Foreigner.
Nihil enim in speciem fallacius est quam prava religio. -Liv. xxxix. 16.

Geocalyx
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Re: Iao-Oannes

Post by Geocalyx » Mon May 06, 2019 2:32 pm

Where did you get that numbering system? That's not PIstis Sophia book 1, it's 4. Or 5. The last one, anyway - the 'Jeouian', independent one.

IAO is the sacred voice of the Tufon (the Donkey), from which the day emanates. As an Italian, have you personally ever witnessed what donkeys do before dawn all across Mediterranean coast? They start spamming the sacred voice like bloody maniacs and voe betide to any groggy tourist trying to get some shut-eye in the range of 2 kilometers. (So up in mainland Europe roosters do the same thing, and the Celts used to believe it actually makes the sun go up. I dunno about you, but the 1st book of Ieou makes much more sense to me than it used to, knowing all this.) With all this in mind, check out the kind of oldest graffiti in the world featuring a donkey-headed Jesus.

I am 70/30 on the whole "Jeouian corpus" (books of Ieou & another portion of the scrolls of the savior or whatever it's called) being nothing but elaborate and highly sophisticated (=ontologically consistent yet completely insane... to prove a point) mockery. If they could somehow throw John into it, great, even better. But it's your topic.

Edit: I for the life of me cannot comprehend where you got "Pistis Sophia 1:370;353". If anything, the numbering should be like "Askewianus 4:1,20-43", since it's right at the start of the text. Search on Google & DDG provides no hints.

Giuseppe
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Re: Iao-Oannes

Post by Giuseppe » Tue May 07, 2019 10:01 am

Geocalyx wrote:
Mon May 06, 2019 2:32 pm
what donkeys do before dawn all across Mediterranean coast?
thank you for this. The donkey works as a precursor of the light of the dawn. This remembers John the Baptist: was he the "Precursor of the Foreigner"? The possible meaning of IAO-OANNES ?

I am sorry, the numbering reference to Pistis Sophia is wrong but the quote is derived from that work.
Nihil enim in speciem fallacius est quam prava religio. -Liv. xxxix. 16.

Ethan
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Re: Iao-Oannes

Post by Ethan » Tue May 07, 2019 10:43 am

The Donkey is the sacred animal of Bacchus and Iao Iao is his cry, it all stems from the Winery culture of ancient Italy. John probably from Διόγονος "Given by Zeus", epithet of Bacchus and pun for δίγονος "Twice-born"
also an epithet of Βάκχος/בכות. The entire religion of Abraham is Dionysian, confirmed by Plutarch.

The Donkey of the Alexamenos graffito is flayed, the skin turned into wine-skin.

Plato. Euthyd. 285c
Then Ctesippus said: I too, Socrates, am ready to offer myself to be skinned by the strangers even more, if they choose, than they are doing now, if my hide (δορὰ ) is not to end by being made into a wine-skin (ἀσκὸν) , like that of Marsyas, but into the shape of virtue
https://vivliothikiagiasmatos.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/joseph-yahuda-hebrew-is-greek.pdf
paypal.me/Napples

Geocalyx
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Re: Iao-Oannes

Post by Geocalyx » Wed May 08, 2019 2:40 pm

You definitely struck a rich vein with the Bacchus reference - one of the askewianus texts (either book 1 or book 4/5) associates "Little Iao the Good" with "Sabaoth Adamas". From what I can gather from the Internet, Sabaoth is Saturn, skywise - and Saturn is associated with jubilations (btw - unrelated, but... is there any possibilty that the Roman name Saturnus stems from Greek Saturos? There's both "Saturnalia" and "Saturae" in Latin, and both words imply "fun times" in their own way). I also vaguely recall a myth about a Satyr competing with the goddess Athena in flute-playing contest, who, after losing, gets flayed, and another one in which the protagonist (maybe king Midas?) ends up with donkey's ears after having their curse removed. Both are comedies, of course.

Donkeys are, in general, often featured in ancient satyrical writings (Apuleus). The books of Ieou fail to mention the tuphon explicitly, but they do have his voice presented as mystery. While they are worded like serious technical religious texts, The Holy Book of the great invisible Spirit and Trimorphic Protennoia also feature the voice... but are definitely not serious technical religious texts... so I'm thinking the voice might be a clue to the initiated that the text in question shouldn't be taken too seriously. (Like, if the ridiculous punishments meant for sinning soul, described in books 3 and 5 of pistis sophia, didn't make it obvious enough...)

andrewcriddle
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Re: Iao-Oannes

Post by andrewcriddle » Thu May 09, 2019 10:34 am

Geocalyx wrote:
Wed May 08, 2019 2:40 pm
You definitely struck a rich vein with the Bacchus reference - one of the askewianus texts (either book 1 or book 4/5) associates "Little Iao the Good" with "Sabaoth Adamas". From what I can gather from the Internet, Sabaoth is Saturn, skywise - and Saturn is associated with jubilations (btw - unrelated, but... is there any possibilty that the Roman name Saturnus stems from Greek Saturos? There's both "Saturnalia" and "Saturae" in Latin, and both words imply "fun times" in their own way). I also vaguely recall a myth about a Satyr competing with the goddess Athena in flute-playing contest, who, after losing, gets flayed, and another one in which the protagonist (maybe king Midas?) ends up with donkey's ears after having their curse removed. Both are comedies, of course.

Marsyas competed with Apollo not Athena.

Andrew Criddle

Giuseppe
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Re: Iao-Oannes

Post by Giuseppe » Thu May 09, 2019 9:08 pm

Marsyas a version of Attis, a dying and rising god.
Nihil enim in speciem fallacius est quam prava religio. -Liv. xxxix. 16.

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