“...and to God what is God’s”: is Jesus talking about the demiurge?

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Giuseppe
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“...and to God what is God’s”: is Jesus talking about the demiurge?

Post by Giuseppe » Tue Jul 23, 2019 10:25 am


Later they sent some of the Pharisees and Herodians to Jesus to catch him in his words. 14 They came to him and said, “Teacher, we know that you are a man of integrity. You aren’t swayed by others, because you pay no attention to who they are; but you teach the way of God in accordance with the truth. Is it right to pay the imperial tax to Caesar or not? 15 Should we pay or shouldn’t we?”

But Jesus knew their hypocrisy. “Why are you trying to trap me?” he asked. “Bring me a denarius and let me look at it.” 16 They brought the coin, and he asked them, “Whose image is this? And whose inscription?”

“Caesar’s,” they replied.

17 Then Jesus said to them, “Give back to Caesar what is Caesar’s and to God what is God’s.”

And they were amazed at him.

(Mark 12:13-17)

The Coin, in virtue of the his circular form, is a symbol of the world/cosmos hence the world/cosmos is property of the his creator: the demiurge. Jesus is warning that the source of the power of Caesar is the demiurge. They were "amazed at him" because he seemed to recognize the authority of the demiurge on the his creation, despite of the his being an alien. The midrash from Romans 13:

Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God. 2 Consequently, whoever rebels against the authority is rebelling against what God has instituted, and those who do so will bring judgment on themselves. 3 For rulers hold no terror for those who do right, but for those who do wrong. Do you want to be free from fear of the one in authority? Then do what is right and you will be commended. 4 For the one in authority is God’s servant for your good. But if you do wrong, be afraid, for rulers do not bear the sword for no reason. They are God’s servants, agents of wrath to bring punishment on the wrongdoer. 5 Therefore, it is necessary to submit to the authorities, not only because of possible punishment but also as a matter of conscience.

6 This is also why you pay taxes, for the authorities are God’s servants, who give their full time to governing. 7 Give to everyone what you owe them: If you owe taxes, pay taxes; if revenue, then revenue; if respect, then respect; if honor, then honor.

...reveals that the archons (referred by Paul) served the demiurge.

The passage (in both Romans 13 and in Mark) is therefore of marcionite origin.
Nihil enim in speciem fallacius est quam prava religio. -Liv. xxxix. 16.

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