Traces of Patripassianism in Acts 20:28

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Giuseppe
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Traces of Patripassianism in Acts 20:28

Post by Giuseppe » Thu Oct 10, 2019 9:46 am


Keep watch over yourselves and all the flock of which the Holy Spirit has made you overseers. Be shepherds of the church of God, which he bought with his own blood.

(Acts 20:28)

It is God himself who suffers in the flesh.

I am wondering if the Patripassianism is connected someway with separationism.

See what prof Hill says:
Giuseppe wrote:
Tue Oct 08, 2019 8:45 am

It is just possible, because of his adoptionist Christology, that Cerinthus could have conceived of this Jewish Messiah as the human Jesus sans his adoptive heavenly counterpart. Irenaeus, followed by Hippolytus, says that Cerinthus taught that the abandoned Jesus did rise from the dead. Presumably he ascended to the Demiurge .... It is possible, though at this point uncertain, that it is this ascended Jesus who was expected to come again to restore the Creator's people

(my bold)
Nihil enim in speciem fallacius est quam prava religio. -Liv. xxxix. 16.

andrewcriddle
Posts: 1765
Joined: Sat Oct 05, 2013 12:36 am

Re: Traces of Patripassianism in Acts 20:28

Post by andrewcriddle » Thu Oct 10, 2019 10:04 am

Giuseppe wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 9:46 am

Keep watch over yourselves and all the flock of which the Holy Spirit has made you overseers. Be shepherds of the church of God, which he bought with his own blood.

(Acts 20:28)

It is God himself who suffers in the flesh.

I am wondering if the Patripassianism is connected someway with separationism.

See what prof Hill says:
Giuseppe wrote:
Tue Oct 08, 2019 8:45 am

It is just possible, because of his adoptionist Christology, that Cerinthus could have conceived of this Jewish Messiah as the human Jesus sans his adoptive heavenly counterpart. Irenaeus, followed by Hippolytus, says that Cerinthus taught that the abandoned Jesus did rise from the dead. Presumably he ascended to the Demiurge .... It is possible, though at this point uncertain, that it is this ascended Jesus who was expected to come again to restore the Creator's people

(my bold)
The text is uncertain See https://biblehub.com/acts/20-28.htm It should possibly read the church of the Lord

Andrew Criddle

Giuseppe
Posts: 6523
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:37 am
Location: Italy

Re: Traces of Patripassianism in Acts 20:28

Post by Giuseppe » Thu Oct 10, 2019 11:20 am


1 Simon Peter, a servant and apostle of Jesus Christ,

To those who through the righteousness of our God and Savior Jesus Christ have received a faith as precious as ours:

(2 Peter 1:1)

while we wait for the blessed hope—the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ.

(Titus 2:13)

Melito of Sardi, Peri Pascha 96–97:

The God has been murdered; the King of Israel has been put to death by an Israelite right hand”

Nihil enim in speciem fallacius est quam prava religio. -Liv. xxxix. 16.

Ethan
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Location: England

Re: Traces of Patripassianism in Acts 20:28

Post by Ethan » Thu Oct 10, 2019 2:43 pm

Its anachronistic for the translation to read 'Church of God', the Book of Act indeed emulates the Septuagint, so τὴν ἐκκλησίαν τοῦ θεοῦ in Acts came from את־הקהל האלהים and this always translates 'the congregation of God' in the Old Testament.

Deuteronomy 23:1; the congregation of the Lord. ἐκκλησίαν κυρίου (LXX)
Nehemiah 13:1; the congregation of God (ἐκκλησίᾳ θεοῦ)

In New Testament, ἐκκλησίαν is never translated congregation and in the Old Testament, ἐκκλησίαν/את־הקהל is never translated as a Church. One cannot trust Christian translations of the New Testament.
https://vivliothikiagiasmatos.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/joseph-yahuda-hebrew-is-greek.pdf

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