Other evidence that Ascension of Isaiah is based on a gnostic source from Satornilians: the Archon as the FOREIGNER

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Giuseppe
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Other evidence that Ascension of Isaiah is based on a gnostic source from Satornilians: the Archon as the FOREIGNER

Post by Giuseppe » Sat Dec 21, 2019 6:44 am

Roger Parvus had reported the view of Alfred Loisy about the Ascension of Isaiah being derived from a gnostic source where Jesus was killed by the demiurge (the god of the Jews). That gnostic text was from Satornilus, i.e. gnostic haters of YHWH preceding Marcion.

Now I find another evidence about the sound truth of that thesis:

In the Ethiopian version of AoI, the "Prince of this world" (killer of Jesus) is called "The foreigner".

More precisely, the "Sons of Israel" are moved by the "foreigner" to kill Jesus.

Now we know that for the Gnostics, "foreigner" or "alien" is only the "unknown" father of Jesus.

The same "Barabbas" is a parody of the gnostic Son of Father, insofar he is not called Messiah (Christ) and insofar "Bar-Abbas" was the name usually given by the Jews to the bastard sons of unknown father (just as "Jon Snow" in the magical world of Westeros means "Jon son of unknown father").

Hence this is another strong clue pointing to Ascension of Isaiah being the mere judaization of a previous Gnostic text, where "foreigner" was only the father of Jesus, and not the "Archon of this world" who killed him.

This is another evidence pointing that fact, since the reader of Giuseppe's posts knows already what is a previous evidence of the same fact: the fact that in a different version of the AoI, it is said that the "Archon of this world" kills the his own son, betraying so the desire of rehabilitating gradually the demiurge as the supreme god, in opposition to the Unknown God of the gnostics.
Nihil enim in speciem fallacius est quam prava religio. -Liv. xxxix. 16.

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