Page 1 of 1

new issue: J. of the Jesus Movement in its Jewish Setting

Posted: Tue Dec 01, 2020 12:33 am
by StephenGoranson
http://www.jjmjs.org/

JJMJS Issue 7 (2020)

Dear reader,

We are pleased to announce a new issue of JJMJS, even as it comes in the midst of a pandemic that has now plagued the globe for the better part of 2020. The current movement towards open access in academic publishing has very much proven its significance and relevance in situations such as this, especially when libraries have been forced to close. JJMJS is happy to be part of this open-access movement, as the journal aims to play an important role for the study of the intersection between Judaism and Christianity from the first to the seventh century.

The seventh issue of the journal engages scholarship across disciplines, moving us through the first few centuries of the common era, beginning with Paul and ending with the Church Fathers.

In “A Few Good (Adopted) Men: A Renewed Assessment of the Influences for Paul’s Adoption Metaphor through an Analysis of Women’s Marginal Place in Jewish, Greek, and Roman Adoption Traditions,” Carmen Palmer notes a change towards gender inclusivity from Galatians to Romans and asks why Paul made this change in his writings. Offering a broad analysis and summarising significant strands of current research on Romans 11, František Ábel addresses the meaning of Israel in the process of eschatological inclusion of gentiles in “The Role of Israel Concerning the Gentiles in the Context of Romans 11:25–27.”

Drawing on and contributing to recent studies of first-century synagogues, Andrew R. Krause offers a new understanding of the historical setting of Jesus’s reading of Isaiah in Nazareth in Luke 4: “Reading Texts and Reading Practice: Luke 4 in the Context of First-Century Synagogue Reading Practices.” The Gospel of John is the centre of attention in two articles: Roger David Aus, “The Judaic Background of the ‘Beloved Disciple’ in the Gospel of John,” which highlights the Jewish context of the fourth gospel, and Anthony LeDonne’s review article of Adele Reinhartz’s latest and major study on John: “Reading John with Reinhartz: Reception of and Reflections on Cast Out of the Covenant.”

Before LeDonne’s discussion of Reinhartz’s magnum opus, however, Collin Cornell contributes to the complex issue of the so-called parting of the ways between Jews and Christians through a closer look at the relationship between Idumaism and Early Judaism as recounted by Josephus in “The Costobar Affair: Comparing Idumaism and Early Judaism.” In it, Cornell ask the question: What can Josephus teach us about Judaism and Christianity as species of Hellenistic Levantine cult? Finally, Eyal Regev approaches one of the key elements in Christian discourses on Judaism, the Jerusalem temple, and problematises common understandings of how the Church Fathers approached traditional Jewish cultic ideas in “The Early Church Fathers on Sacrifices and Temple: Rejection, Substitution, or Metaphor?”

As always, the Forum is open for comments and discussion.

On behalf of the Editorial Committee,

Anders Runesson
Editor-in-Chief

Re: new issue: J. of the Jesus Movement in its Jewish Setting

Posted: Tue Dec 01, 2020 5:27 am
by Ben C. Smith
StephenGoranson wrote:
Tue Dec 01, 2020 12:33 am
http://www.jjmjs.org/

JJMJS Issue 7 (2020)

Dear reader,

....

On behalf of the Editorial Committee,

Anders Runesson
Editor-in-Chief
Thanks, Stephen. Always interested in a new piece by Aus, especially.