The Mishna, etc

Discussion about the Hebrew Bible, Septuagint, pseudepigrapha, Philo, Josephus, Talmud, Dead Sea Scrolls, archaeology, etc.
iskander
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Re: The Mishna, etc

Post by iskander » Wed Sep 12, 2018 4:00 pm

Follow the yellow brick road ...

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iskander
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Re: The Mishna, etc

Post by iskander » Wed Sep 12, 2018 4:05 pm

The wizard of Oz
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iskander
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Re: The Mishna, etc

Post by iskander » Wed Sep 12, 2018 4:08 pm

The heavens above
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iskander
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Re: The Mishna, etc

Post by iskander » Wed Sep 12, 2018 4:13 pm

Matter is found guilty,--

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iskander
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Re: The Mishna, etc

Post by iskander » Wed Sep 12, 2018 4:22 pm


iskander
Posts: 2017
Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2015 12:38 pm

Re: The Mishna, etc

Post by iskander » Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:03 pm

Gnosis and Judaism,
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From , Gershom Scholem, Kabbalah

To what extent the growth of Gnostic tendencies within Judaism itself preceded their development in early Christianity is still the subject of lively scholarly controversy. Peterson, Haenchen, and Quispel, in particular, along with several experts on the Dead Sea Scrolls, have tried to prove that Jewish forms of Gnosis, which retained a belief in the unity of God and rejected any dualistic notions, came into being before the formation of Christianity and were centered particularly around the idea of primordial man (following speculation on Gen. 1 : 2 6 ; " Adam Kadmon"). The image of the Messiah, characteristic of the Christian Gnostics, was absent here. These scholars have interpreted several of the earliest documents of Gnostic literature as Gnostic Midrashim on cosmogony and Haenchen in particular has argued that their basic Jewish character is clearly recognizable in an analysis of the teaching of Simon Magus, apparently the leader of Samaritan Gnosis, a first-century heterodox Judaism. Even before this, M. Friedlaender had surmised that antinomian Gnostic tendencies (which belittled the value of the Commandments) had also developed within Judaism before the rise of Christianity

iskander
Posts: 2017
Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2015 12:38 pm

Re: The Mishna, etc

Post by iskander » Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:06 pm

iskander wrote:
Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:03 pm
Gnosis and Judaism,
Attachement
gnostic1.PNG

From , Gershom Scholem, Kabbalah

To what extent the growth of Gnostic tendencies within Judaism itself preceded their development in early Christianity is still the subject of lively scholarly controversy. Peterson, Haenchen, and Quispel, in particular, along with several experts on the Dead Sea Scrolls, have tried to prove that Jewish forms of Gnosis, which retained a belief in the unity of God and rejected any dualistic notions, came into being before the formation of Christianity and were centered particularly around the idea of primordial man (following speculation on Gen. 1 : 2 6 ; " Adam Kadmon"). The image of the Messiah, characteristic of the Christian Gnostics, was absent here. These scholars have interpreted several of the earliest documents of Gnostic literature as Gnostic Midrashim on cosmogony and Haenchen in particular has argued that their basic Jewish character is clearly recognizable in an analysis of the teaching of Simon Magus, apparently the leader of Samaritan Gnosis, a first-century heterodox Judaism. Even before this, M. Friedlaender had surmised that antinomian Gnostic tendencies (which belittled the value of the Commandments) had also developed within Judaism before the rise of Christianity
Concepts which did not originate exclusively in Jewish mysticism, like the idea of the Shekhinah and the hypostases of stern judgment and compassion, could easily have been interpreted according to the theory of the "aeons" and incorporated with Gnostic ideas. The "exile of the Shekhinah," originally an aggadic idea, was assimilated in Jewish circles at a particular stage with the Gnostic idea of the divine spark that is in exile in the terrestrial world, and also with the mystic view of the Jewish concept of the keneset Yisrael ("the community of Israel") as a
heavenly entity that represents the historical community of Israel.

iskander
Posts: 2017
Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2015 12:38 pm

Re: The Mishna, etc

Post by iskander » Fri Sep 14, 2018 11:14 am

The Question about the Resurrection
23 The same day some Sadducees came to him, saying there is no resurrection and they asked
him a question, saying,
24“Teacher, Moses said, ‘If a man dies childless, his brother shall marry the widow, and raise up children for his brother.’ 25Now there were seven brothers among us; the first married, and died childless, leaving the widow to his brother. 26The second did the same, so also the third, down to the seventh. 27Last of all, the woman herself died. 28In the resurrection, then, whose wife of the seven will she be? For all of them had married her.”



The Sadducees did not believe in the resurrection of the dead and they were just poking fun. at Jesus.

But, how would the Shammaites and the Hilleltes have answered the same question?
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iskander
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Re: The Mishna, etc

Post by iskander » Fri Sep 14, 2018 11:15 am

continued
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iskander
Posts: 2017
Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2015 12:38 pm

Re: The Mishna, etc

Post by iskander » Fri Sep 14, 2018 2:08 pm

iskander wrote:
Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:06 pm
iskander wrote:
Thu Sep 13, 2018 2:03 pm
Gnosis and Judaism,
Attachement
gnostic1.PNG

From , Gershom Scholem, Kabbalah

To what extent the growth of Gnostic tendencies within Judaism itself preceded their development in early Christianity is still the subject of lively scholarly controversy. Peterson, Haenchen, and Quispel, in particular, along with several experts on the Dead Sea Scrolls, have tried to prove that Jewish forms of Gnosis, which retained a belief in the unity of God and rejected any dualistic notions, came into being before the formation of Christianity and were centered particularly around the idea of primordial man (following speculation on Gen. 1 : 2 6 ; " Adam Kadmon"). The image of the Messiah, characteristic of the Christian Gnostics, was absent here. These scholars have interpreted several of the earliest documents of Gnostic literature as Gnostic Midrashim on cosmogony and Haenchen in particular has argued that their basic Jewish character is clearly recognizable in an analysis of the teaching of Simon Magus, apparently the leader of Samaritan Gnosis, a first-century heterodox Judaism. Even before this, M. Friedlaender had surmised that antinomian Gnostic tendencies (which belittled the value of the Commandments) had also developed within Judaism before the rise of Christianity
Concepts which did not originate exclusively in Jewish mysticism, like the idea of the Shekhinah and the hypostases of stern judgment and compassion, could easily have been interpreted according to the theory of the "aeons" and incorporated with Gnostic ideas. The "exile of the Shekhinah," originally an aggadic idea, was assimilated in Jewish circles at a particular stage with the Gnostic idea of the divine spark that is in exile in the terrestrial world, and also with the mystic view of the Jewish concept of the keneset Yisrael ("the community of Israel") as a
heavenly entity that represents the historical community of Israel.
one god. but two or more hypostases
From , Gershom Scholem, Kabbalah
It is evident, however, that in Jewish Gnostic circles the concept of the Shekhinah occupied a completely new position. In the early sources "Shekhinah " is an expression used to denote the presence of God Himself in the world and is no more than a name for that presence; it later becomes a hypostasis distinguished from God, a distinction that
first appears in the late Midrash to Proverbs (Mid. Prov. 47a : "the Shekhinah stood before the Holy One, blessed be He, and said to Him").

In contrast to this separation of God and His Shekhinah, there arose another original concept - the identification of the Shekhinah with keneset Yisrael ("the community o f Israel)

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