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relatively new Robert Eisenman book on DSS

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 6:42 am
by StephenGoranson
Title: Breaking the Dead Sea Scrolls Monopoly: A New Interpretation of the Messianic Movement in Palestine (2018) amazon/kindle and pb.

The first part gives his version of the history toward open access of the DSS. One item of interest is that he names Robert Schlosser
as the photographer who supplied him with copies of photos of DSS that were published in book form (Facsimile Edition, 2 vols. 1991). Schlosser was associated with Elizabeth Bechtel who deposited photos at the Huntington Library. That Library back then allowed interlibrary loans for temporary loans of microfilm (after a $50 dollar fee).
The second part gives his interpretation of the Scrolls. I find the first part relatively more interesting.

Re: relatively new Robert Eisenman book on DSS

Posted: Mon May 20, 2019 4:14 pm
by Jax
StephenGoranson wrote:
Thu Nov 08, 2018 6:42 am
Title: Breaking the Dead Sea Scrolls Monopoly: A New Interpretation of the Messianic Movement in Palestine (2018) amazon/kindle and pb.

The first part gives his version of the history toward open access of the DSS. One item of interest is that he names Robert Schlosser
as the photographer who supplied him with copies of photos of DSS that were published in book form (Facsimile Edition, 2 vols. 1991). Schlosser was associated with Elizabeth Bechtel who deposited photos at the Huntington Library. That Library back then allowed interlibrary loans for temporary loans of microfilm (after a $50 dollar fee).
The second part gives his interpretation of the Scrolls. I find the first part relatively more interesting.
Thank you.

Lane

Re: relatively new Robert Eisenman book on DSS

Posted: Mon May 20, 2019 7:02 pm
by DCHindley
StephenGoranson wrote:
Thu Nov 08, 2018 6:42 am
Title: Breaking the Dead Sea Scrolls Monopoly: A New Interpretation of the Messianic Movement in Palestine (2018) amazon/kindle and pb.

The first part gives his version of the history toward open access of the DSS. One item of interest is that he names Robert Schlosser
as the photographer who supplied him with copies of photos of DSS that were published in book form (Facsimile Edition, 2 vols. 1991). Schlosser was associated with Elizabeth Bechtel who deposited photos at the Huntington Library. That Library back then allowed interlibrary loans for temporary loans of microfilm (after a $50 dollar fee).
The second part gives his interpretation of the Scrolls. I find the first part relatively more interesting.
I remember realizing that Eisenman had provided a translation of one fragmentary scroll that was quite different than the one that came out of an anthorized translator (who translates a scroll formally assigned to him). Off hand I do not remember which scroll it was, maybe MMT? Regardless of the relative merit, I thought his translation felt more straightforward.

Back in Prodigy(r) days he promoted one of his books and I exchanged a few e-mails with him and told him so. He had outlined some of the hurdles he had to jump, and daggers he felt had been thrust into his back by "collaborators" such as Hershal Shanks (he absolutely hates the man). Shanks had agreed to finance the publication of the Facimile Edition, and Eisenman said he himself fronted the money required to gain full access to the photos of the fragments, on the understanding Shanks would reimburse him. Shanks never responded to his e-mails to Shanks seeking reimbursement while going ahead and putting the book out as if he himself (Shanks) had removed the obstacles to their publication. Eisenman says didn't realize much if any money out of the book sales. Whether he went to court about it I do not know.

At least that was my fuzzy recollection. The DOS laptop that contains those messages had long before been retired to my laptop graveyard (there's about 6 down there) next to the collapsed bookshelf memorial. I don't think the screen even works anymore, although I could plug in a VGA monitor.

Over the years, a couple of old desktops had also been tossed. One was an Epson Equity II with a whopping 20 Mb HDD ("more capacity than you'll ever need" and "you can run a small business with it") and *two* 80186 chips because of how hard it was to get 80286 chips in the early days! It was used, and had DOS loaded onto it, but I was crestfallen to learn that I also needed software to run on it! Thank goodness for "Shareware." :lol:

Even menu programs were kind of rare, and the value-added resellers who added dBase or FoxPro programming for accounting databases, etc., wanted that to continue. I eventually got to know several of them from PC User Groups. Nobody misses, though, the progressive versions of Windows, Windows 2, Win 95, and then the first really stable version, Win 97, to the more recent ones, Win 7-8-10. :banghead:

DCH