Essenes and Essaeans (for Stephen Goranson).

Discussion about the Hebrew Bible, Septuagint, pseudepigrapha, Philo, Josephus, Talmud, Dead Sea Scrolls, archaeology, etc.
maryhelena
Posts: 1702
Joined: Tue Oct 08, 2013 11:22 pm
Location: England

Re: Essenes and Essaeans (for Stephen Goranson).

Post by maryhelena » Fri Sep 25, 2020 6:52 am

StephenGoranson wrote:
Fri Sep 25, 2020 6:28 am
Since "Spin," as far as I know, has not published the article, it is difficult to know what anyone is agreeing with, except that maryhelena and that author--sometimes hard to tell them apart--apparently agree often.
Goodness - spin would have a fit being linked with me.... :hysterical:

One thing I did learn from spin is this: Millions of people have lived their lives in ancient times - but to be a historical figure requires evidence of existence. So, bye bye historical Jesus, with that coat of many colours....

As for spin and Greek - way over my head. My interest is the NT story. Yes, words, Greek words, present the story but it's the story that holds the world in its grasp.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
W.B. Yeats

StephenGoranson
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Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2015 2:10 am

Re: Essenes and Essaeans (for Stephen Goranson).

Post by StephenGoranson » Fri Sep 25, 2020 7:26 am

Does an opinion about narrative prove a negative? Neveryoumind.

maryhelena
Posts: 1702
Joined: Tue Oct 08, 2013 11:22 pm
Location: England

Re: Essenes and Essaeans (for Stephen Goranson).

Post by maryhelena » Fri Sep 25, 2020 7:46 am

StephenGoranson wrote:
Fri Sep 25, 2020 7:26 am
Does an opinion about narrative prove a negative? Neveryoumind.
Opinions about narrative, as opinions about Greek words, do not prove a negative.

Words, Greek words, are a tool that creates a narrative. One can enjoy the narrative for what it is or dismiss it's story as unrealistic and move on. An alternative is to view the narrative as an allegory - that way opens up a road toward history and philosophy. Indeed, many interpretations of the allegory are possible. Ultimately, any interpretation has to reflect or echo historical reality (all in the mind re philosophy only takes one so far). In other words - allegorical interpretation needs to have historical support in order to be a viable interpretation/understanding of the allegorical story.

The narrative, the story we have in the NT is simply the top dressing. Searching for early christians origins necessitates that we dig deep and well. There you go....narrative archaeology.... :)
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
W.B. Yeats

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