Search found 86 matches

by mbuckley3
Mon Nov 21, 2022 5:50 pm
Forum: Classical Texts and History
Topic: Reading silently versus reading aloud in antiquity.
Replies: 20
Views: 16797

Re: Reading silently versus reading aloud in antiquity.

Jerome, Letter 50, 393 AD (NPNF tr.) Jerome has been informed that an uneducated monk has been traducing one of his works in hostile preaching. "Here we have a man who has reached perfection without a teacher, so as to be a vehicle of the spirit and a self-taught genius" / Inventus est hom...
by mbuckley3
Sun Oct 30, 2022 4:31 pm
Forum: Classical Texts and History
Topic: Reading silently versus reading aloud in antiquity.
Replies: 20
Views: 16797

Re: Reading silently versus reading aloud in antiquity.

Here are two examples where, because of failing eyesight, being read to aloud is a last resort. The clear implication is that Pliny and Jerome would normally read silently. Pliny, Letter 7.21 : "I am obedient to your commands, my dear colleague, and I really am taking care of my eyes according ...
by mbuckley3
Fri Oct 28, 2022 4:33 pm
Forum: Christian Texts and History
Topic: What's in a Name ? Simon : The Social Context
Replies: 2
Views: 165

What's in a Name ? Simon : The Social Context

Posts based on tenuous evidence are not unknown on this forum, but this is a necessarily speculative attempt to grasp some of the intangible influences on the literary tradition. Methodological rigour is not claimed. Rather, as John Moles wrote in another context, "..because the evidence is so ...
by mbuckley3
Wed Oct 26, 2022 4:33 pm
Forum: Jewish Texts and History
Topic: Revue de Qumran latest issue
Replies: 9
Views: 332

Re: Revue de Qumran latest issue

Of the 33, zero women, zero children, zero infants, 33 males. A military camp would have similar numbers. [/quote Au contraire, Stephan. Before the fully professional armies of the C19/C20, a large number of 'camp followers' - to use the old, polite term - would have been embedded within any milita...
by mbuckley3
Sun Aug 28, 2022 2:13 pm
Forum: Christian Texts and History
Topic: Plagarism in Antiquity and in Early Christianity
Replies: 1
Views: 224

Re: Plagarism in Antiquity and in Early Christianity

There seems to be some confusion of categories here.Three points. Firstly, in the Imperial era, intertextual allusions and (adapted) quotations were regarded as the 'added value' of fine writing. To describe 2 Peter as the re-fashioning or adaptation of a previous text is a reasonable description. '...
by mbuckley3
Thu Aug 11, 2022 11:21 pm
Forum: Christian Texts and History
Topic: Was Morton Smith a forger?
Replies: 63
Views: 2718

Re: Was Morton Smith a forger?

One argument that I made against Clementine authorship years ago has (rightly or wrongly) been little noticed. http://hypotyposeis.org/weblog/2009/11/educational-and-initiatory-texts.html I argued that the letter attributed to Clement involves Neoplatonic ideas about mystical texts (as distinct fro...
by mbuckley3
Sun Jul 17, 2022 9:41 am
Forum: Christian Texts and History
Topic: Paronomasia and Paul
Replies: 0
Views: 1561

Paronomasia and Paul

Acts 13.9 : "But Saul, who is also Paul.." From this point on, apart from the 'conversion' accounts at 22.7,13, 26.14, the main protagonist is always styled Paul. No explanation is offered. Exegetes from Origen* onwards have thought it a problem requiring a solution. However, I (tentativel...
by mbuckley3
Sun Jun 26, 2022 10:53 am
Forum: Classical Texts and History
Topic: Ancient book dissemination.
Replies: 24
Views: 12489

Re: Ancient book dissemination.

A footnote on libraries. It is a constant frustration that large portions of the works of, in particular, Roman historians are extant only in epitomes, whether ancient or medieval. One of the drivers for this was practical necessity, given the state of the books themselves. The 'mixed' condition of ...
by mbuckley3
Sun Jun 19, 2022 11:30 am
Forum: Classical Texts and History
Topic: Reading silently versus reading aloud in antiquity.
Replies: 20
Views: 16797

Re: Reading silently versus reading aloud in antiquity.

Bernard Knox's splendidly bad-tempered article, referenced in the OP, should have put an end to the scholarly consensus that silent reading was virtually unknown before the fourth century. It did not. In the Classical Quarterly 47/1 (1997), the formidable and exasperated Myles Burnyeat made two cont...
by mbuckley3
Sun Jun 12, 2022 4:58 pm
Forum: Classical Texts and History
Topic: Reading silently versus reading aloud in antiquity.
Replies: 20
Views: 16797

Re: Reading silently versus reading aloud in antiquity.

The eyes have it again in this tale from Pausanias (10.38.13) : "The sanctuary of Asclepius I found in ruins, but it was originally built by a private person called Phalysius. For he had a complaint of the eyes, and when he was almost blind the god at Epidaurus sent to him the poetess Anyte, wh...