Utterly Lost - Help? "K. F. Meyer" (1870s scholar)

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billd89
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Utterly Lost - Help? "K. F. Meyer" (1870s scholar)

Post by billd89 »

I have found an extraordinary article of 137 pages, in German (which I am translating), but I cannot find anything about the Author. He (?) has a very common name.

Die Sieben vor Theben und die chaldäische Woche. 1875. The essay appeared in a Berlin ethnology periodical. I would assume he was a Classicist, Age +35 therefore born before 1840.

Konrad Ferdinand Meyer (1825-1898) was a Swiss historical novelist; it is unclear he is this K. F. Meyer, since none of his novels are even remotely 'close.' I am well aware there were Germans in Russia and Eastern Europe, so I won't assume he's from 'Germany' (Prussia).
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DCHindley
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Re: Utterly Lost - Help? "K. F. Meyer" (1870s scholar)

Post by DCHindley »

Wouldn't be the first 19th century wag to be a one hit wonder, at least under this name.

Consider the subject, the number seven. He is relating the legendary seven gates of Thebes (and what they were thought to signify) with one of the many versions of the "chaldean week" (aka Babylonian week, or Neo-Babylonian week). That, from what I can divine, started out to be a five day week named after the five visible planets, then later 2 days were added for the Sun and Moon, to end up with seven day week.

Who finds that entertaining? :confusedsmiley:
billd89 wrote: Thu May 26, 2022 11:27 am I have found an extraordinary article of 137 pages, in German (which I am translating), but I cannot find anything about the Author. He (?) has a very common name.

Die Sieben vor Theben und die chaldäische Woche. 1875. The essay appeared in a Berlin ethnology periodical. I would assume he was a Classicist, Age +35 therefore born before 1840.

Konrad Ferdinand Meyer (1825-1898) was a Swiss historical novelist; it is unclear he is this K. F. Meyer, since none of his novels are even remotely 'close.' I am well aware there were Germans in Russia and Eastern Europe, so I won't assume he's from 'Germany' (Prussia).
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billd89
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It's super-nerdy analysis, I know

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The expanse of what's covered in the essay is epic; my concern is IF he's a bullshitter, because some of his conclusions are radical and unfamiliar to me (admittedly: an amateur, reading across several disciplines). He footnotes diligently; I believe he's legit. I am concerned because I cannot find biographical data? Literally: a dead-end.

One topic he expands on (for several pages) is "Herakles-Israel". Let's imagine it's true: there was a Phoenicio-Judaic version of Herakles from the area of Lebano-Israel, that OT Esau & Jacob are translations of (Byblos) Usous & Sammenrus. It's fascinating in all the detail he presents: yet, his thesis was ... ignored? Hmmm. I can see why period theologians would hate what he outlines (plus, he was never translated). Well, maybe he was disheartened by the reception he received - dropped out after his first publishing effort, croaked or smthg.

I cannot find anything on him, so I wonder if it's a pseudonym.
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