Heinrich Karl Brugsch: Valid Source??

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billd89
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Heinrich Karl Brugsch: Valid Source??

Post by billd89 »

Trying to check and confirm H. Brugsch, Religion und Mythologie der alten Aegypter [1887], LINK, because some of his expressions (terms and ideas) are not appearing elsewhere. (The DeepL trans. is mine.)

Related to Horus of Hibenu (p. 558) and clearly marked, Sopdu is a war-god (like Anhur) and his role as Egypt’s defender against foreigners (usually in the Typhonic form of the god Seth, also in his conception as Baāl, personified) on the eastern side of the Delta area. As his sacred animal was considered a squatting sparrow-hawk {Accipiter nisus}, called Kamḥes{?}, not infrequently with the pair of feathers on the head, and as his peculiar symbol the triangle, which at the same time included pronunciation of the god's name as Sopdu, Sopt, etc. 1028). In this symbolic form a text describes him as ‘Master Sopdu, Soul of the East, large, squatting sparrow-hawk with a broad pair of feathers’ 1029). In the position of the Kyriotatos {=Most Honorable Lord} of his sanctum he takes the place of the cosmogonic propator of the Great Ennead, according to custom and usage. As such he is “the one who was first as one, the creator of millions, from whose pair of eyes hundreds of thousands have emerged” 1030). ...

1. Horus of Hibenu
2. Kamḥes


No luck on #1.

On #2, Brugsch refers elsewhere to an elaboration of 'Kamḥes' on "Seite 1456" (p.1456 would be in a Vol. 8! I only see 7 vols.) in his own Hieroglyphisch-demotisches Wörterbuch. That work is handwritten and not searchable, a nightmare.

On this mysterious 'Kamḥes' - is there another spelling, term? - I have found only a footnote reference D. Mallet (1904), 'uncertain' :

(2) The word {Symbols}, with its variants, appears in the Dict. hiérogl. of Brugsch {i.e. the untranslated Hieroglyphisch-demotisches Wörterbuch}, p.1456. The author cites examples from Gourna {village in Egypt}, from Dendera. "It is," he says, "a name or title applied to Hor-Ra, the precise meaning of which is uncertain." -- I will add that we find especially numerous examples of this at Edfu; thus: Mémoires Publiés Par Les Membres De La Mission Archéologique Française Au Caire, 1. XI [1897?], p.19, col. 21; p.20, col. 80; p.22, col, 19, col. 31; p.34, etc. Would we be dealing with the same title, applying here to the god Thoth, the ibis replacing the mummified hawk, the ordinary determinative of the name Kamhes? But perhaps the word, incomplete in our inscription, is simply a form of the root 'look, to observe'. That is why I have translated it, conjecturally, by: "who watches over the temple {Symbol}. Or is it to be understood as: divine Kamhes, who...", etc.

andrewcriddle
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Re: Heinrich Karl Brugsch: Valid Source??

Post by andrewcriddle »

billd89 wrote: Fri Apr 01, 2022 10:58 am Trying to check and confirm H. Brugsch, Religion und Mythologie der alten Aegypter [1887], LINK, because some of his expressions (terms and ideas) are not appearing elsewhere. (The DeepL trans. is mine.)

Related to Horus of Hibenu (p. 558) and clearly marked, Sopdu is a war-god (like Anhur) and his role as Egypt’s defender against foreigners (usually in the Typhonic form of the god Seth, also in his conception as Baāl, personified) on the eastern side of the Delta area. As his sacred animal was considered a squatting sparrow-hawk {Accipiter nisus}, called Kamḥes{?}, not infrequently with the pair of feathers on the head, and as his peculiar symbol the triangle, which at the same time included pronunciation of the god's name as Sopdu, Sopt, etc. 1028). In this symbolic form a text describes him as ‘Master Sopdu, Soul of the East, large, squatting sparrow-hawk with a broad pair of feathers’ 1029). In the position of the Kyriotatos {=Most Honorable Lord} of his sanctum he takes the place of the cosmogonic propator of the Great Ennead, according to custom and usage. As such he is “the one who was first as one, the creator of millions, from whose pair of eyes hundreds of thousands have emerged” 1030). ...

1. Horus of Hibenu
2. Kamḥes


No luck on #1.

On #2, Brugsch refers elsewhere to an elaboration of 'Kamḥes' on "Seite 1456" (p.1456 would be in a Vol. 8! I only see 7 vols.) in his own Hieroglyphisch-demotisches Wörterbuch. That work is handwritten and not searchable, a nightmare.

On this mysterious 'Kamḥes' - is there another spelling, term? - I have found only a footnote reference D. Mallet (1904), 'uncertain' :

(2) The word {Symbols}, with its variants, appears in the Dict. hiérogl. of Brugsch {i.e. the untranslated Hieroglyphisch-demotisches Wörterbuch}, p.1456. The author cites examples from Gourna {village in Egypt}, from Dendera. "It is," he says, "a name or title applied to Hor-Ra, the precise meaning of which is uncertain." -- I will add that we find especially numerous examples of this at Edfu; thus: Mémoires Publiés Par Les Membres De La Mission Archéologique Française Au Caire, 1. XI [1897?], p.19, col. 21; p.20, col. 80; p.22, col, 19, col. 31; p.34, etc. Would we be dealing with the same title, applying here to the god Thoth, the ibis replacing the mummified hawk, the ordinary determinative of the name Kamhes? But perhaps the word, incomplete in our inscription, is simply a form of the root 'look, to observe'. That is why I have translated it, conjecturally, by: "who watches over the temple {Symbol}. Or is it to be understood as: divine Kamhes, who...", etc.

These may be relevant I'm not sure.
Sopdu

Sopdu religion

Andrew Criddle
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