From Chrestian to Christian - Philip beyond the grave

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mlinssen
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From Chrestian to Christian - Philip beyond the grave

Post by mlinssen »

It's finally there, "concise Philip"

Thomas Miscellaneous, Part VI, 2022

It ought to be common knowledge that no Greek or Latin manuscript ever writes out the name for Jesus or Christ in full: where the Greek exclusively uses ⲓⲥ ⲭⲥ, the Latin employs ⲓⲏⲥ ⲭⲣⲥ, even literally transcribing those Greek letters.
The Coptic tradition is the exception and mixes these, and does so even in single manuscripts - and the entire Nag Hammadi Library (NHL) provides ample attestation to that.
An absolutely grand exception is the fact that the NHL does write the full word for "Christ" yet as Chrest, ⲭⲣⲏⲥⲧⲟⲥ - a matter addressed in my 'Jesus the Chrest'

This paper deals with an even more exceptional case, namely the fact that the NHL contains the only text in the entire world that combines ⲭⲣⲏⲥⲧⲓⲁⲛⲟⲥ as well as ⲭⲣⲓⲥⲧⲓⲁⲛⲟⲥ in one and the same text; Philip is this most unique text, and Philip contains it all: ⲓⲥ̅, ⲓ̅ⲏ̅ⲥ, ⲭⲥ̅, ⲭⲣⲥ̅, ⲭⲣⲏⲥⲧⲓⲁⲛⲟⲥ and ⲭⲣⲓⲥⲧⲓⲁⲛⲟⲥ

That is not all: Philip explains what these ligatures signify, whence they derive, yet most importantly: which came before what.
Philip instructs us about Chrestianity preceding Christianity, and how and why Chrestians came to be named Christian

(6) When we were Hebrew we were made orphan; we had only our mother. Yet after we became Chrestian, father came to be with mother to us.
(20) ΙΣ is a hidden name, but the ΧΡΣ is a name that appeared: while ΙΣ doesn’t exist in any language, he is called ΙΗΣ. The ΧΡΣ is his name, however. In Syrian it is Messias, in Greek it is ΧΣ.
The Nazarenos who appeared is with he who is hidden!
(51) The apostles - who were there in our beginning - called him ΙΗΣ the Nazoraios Messias; and that means ΙΗΣ the Nazoraios the ΧΣ. The last name is ‘the ΧΣ’, the first is ‘ΙΣ’, and that in the middle is ‘the Nazarenos’. Messias has two meanings: both ‘the ΧΡΣ’ as well as ‘he who is measured.’ ΙΣ in Hebrew means the rescue, Nazara means the truth: the Nazarenos therefore means the truth.
(53) If you say “I am a Jude” then no one will be moved. If you say “I am a Roman” then no one will be stirred. If you say “I am a Greek, a barbarian, a slave or free” then no one will be disturbed.
Yet if you say “I am a Chrestian” then […] will tremble.
(63) If one goes down to the water and comes up without taking anything and says “I am a Chrestian” then he has taken the name on loan. Yet if he takes the spirit which is pure, he has the gift of the name. He who has taken a gift doesn’t get her carried away from him – yet he who has taken on loan gets cut.
(72) Those who beget the name of the father, the child and the spirit which is pure don’t only beget them, but they are begotten to you. If one does not beget them, the other name will get carried away from him. Yet one takes them in the chrism of the […] of the power of the ⲥ⳨ⲟⲥ, which is what the apostles called “the right hand with the left hand” - this one Indeed is no longer a Chrestian, but an ΧΡΣ.
(101) The chreism has been made master over the baptism; for because of the chrism did they call us Christian, not because of the baptism. And the ΧΣ was called so because of the chrism, as the father indeed anointed the child, the child however anointed the apostles – and the apostles anointed us.
(103) The master said it beautifully: some went to the reign of king of the heavens laughing, and they came outward one […]: a Chrestian […]
(108) Horses beget horses, humans beget humans, and gods beget gods.
It is the same in […] marriage: there isn’t in […] come to be outward in […] there is no Judean outward in the […] existing and outward in the Judeans the Christians […]


9 pivotal logia, with validated transcription and each lemma hyperlinked to the Coptic Dictionary Online as usual, accompanied by their literal translation, interpretation, papyrus scan and hyperlink.
And substantiated by Tertullian, Tacitus and Suetonius among others (not to forget Justin Martyr), each of whom loudly attest to the existence of Chrestians. With hyperlinks to their MS, as usual

https://www.academia.edu/89583617/From_ ... _the_grave
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Re: From Chrestian to Christian - Philip beyond the grave

Post by MrMacSon »

Well done. The Gospel attributed to Philip is a key early-Christian text

From pp.7-8:


It is a story about Chrestians deriving from Hebrews (not Judaics nor Judeans); and do note that Philip uses three different words for each:
ϩⲉⲃⲣⲁⲓⲟⲥ, ϊⲟⲩⲇⲁϊ, and ⲓⲟⲩⲇⲁⲓⲟⲥ – Hebrew, Judaic (or Jude), and Judean.

A story about ΧΡΣ, who is called ΧΣ in Greek (and Messias in Syrian). And, whereas the entire Greek tradition attests to an exclusive use of ΙΣ ΧΣ (save for Bezae and some scraps), Philip states that ΙΣ doesn’t exist in any language; it is a ‘hidden name’, and he is called ΙΗΣ – and Philip seems to be wholly unaware of even a single Greek MS.

A story about Chrestians being baptised...in the name of the father, son and holy spirit – and even receiving the holy spirit ...

And on top of that fully complete baptism in water that entitled Chrestians to their name, there was fire – and that fire was in the Chrism (logion 33 and 71 among many others...). And that Chrism was what allowed Chrestians to call themselves Christians, provided they had received that Chrism as well

https://www.academia.edu/89583617/From_ ... _the_grave



From p.5-6:


Philip instructs us that ⲓ̅ⲏ̅ⲥ is merely a name for ⲓⲥ̅, and that ⲭⲥ̅ merely is a Greek name for ⲭⲣⲥ̅ (with Messias being the name used in Syrian). Are there any Jews (Judeans or Judaics) involved? No, explicitly not: Philip speaks of Hebrews alone in logion 6; merely people who speak Hebrew – and yet again Philip carefully distinguishes, and he makes the tremendously great distinction between the Hebrews and Judeans (ⲓⲟⲩⲇⲁⲓⲟ[] in logion 108) and Judaics (ϊⲟⲩⲇⲁϊ in logion 53).

Yet another hot topic that Philip addresses is the distinction between Nazoraios and Nazarenos ...

Philip tells us about being Hebrew and then becoming Chrestian (6); and that label is one that supersedes any other (53). But how does one become Chrestian? By being baptised (63), yet only in the name of the father, the son and the holy spirit – and only after having explicitly received said holy spirit was one entitled to call oneself Chrestian. If one did so without meeting the requirement, one was ‘cut (off?)’ (63): ϣⲱⲱⲧ, ‘cut, slay’ – and ‘cut off’ is a most benign interpretation there ...

... what Philip says must literally be repeated regarding taking the name from the father, son and holy spirit (72):

...... One However takes them in the Chrism of the […] of the Power of the ⲥ⳨ⲟⲥ
...... (…)
...... This one Indeed is not anymore a Chrestian; Rather an ΧΡΣ

... There can be little doubt about what is being said here: if Chrestians receive the Chrism, they become their idol, their icon: ΧΡΣ

And when Chrestians have become ΧΡΣ, they change their name once again (101): they can call themselves Christians, precisely because of the Chrism [ⲭⲣⲓⲥⲙⲁ, the Greek loanword for χρῖσμα] – precisely because that was the reason for naming ΧΣ:

...... ⲛ̅ⲧⲁ ⲩⲙⲟⲩⲧⲉ ⲉ ⲡⲉ ⲭⲥ̅ ⲉⲧⲃⲉ ⲡ ⲭⲣⲓⲥⲙⲁ
...... have they called (him) the ΧΣ because-of the Chrism

https://www.academia.edu/89583617/From_ ... _the_grave



From the Conclusion (p.15):


Philip...part of a movement that came to be formed among Hebrews – not Judeans or Judaics – who had ΙΗΣ ΧΡΣ as their icon, the ΧΡΣ which the Syrians called Messias, and which the Greek called ΧΣ1. The first [Philippian(?)] apostles called himΙΗΣ the Nazoraios Messias’, from ‘Nazara’, Truth.


1 was " the Greek ΧΣ " : " which the Greeks called ΧΣ " is correct
Last edited by MrMacSon on Fri Nov 25, 2022 12:50 am, edited 12 times in total.
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Leucius Charinus
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Re: From Chrestian to Christian - Philip beyond the grave

Post by Leucius Charinus »

MrMacSon wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 12:44 amWell done. The Gospel attributed to Philip is a key early-Christian text
With respect to the relationship between "Chrestian" and "Christian" this text appears to serve as some form of "Rosetta Stone" since the text attests to the explicit form of these terms. Yes well done Martijn.
Last edited by Leucius Charinus on Fri Nov 25, 2022 12:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: From Chrestian to Christian - Philip beyond the grave

Post by mlinssen »

MrMacSon wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 12:44 am 1 not sure whether " the Greek ΧΣ " as written is meant; or " which the Greeks called ΧΣ "
Thanks Mac, incorrect contraction there, and a typo. It should read this:

Philip...part of a movement that came to be formed among Hebrews – not Judeans or Judaics – who had ΙΗΣ ΧΡΣ as their icon, the ΧΡΣ which the Syrians called Messias, and which the Greeks called ΧΣ. The first [Philippian(?)] apostles called himΙΗΣ the Nazoraios Messias’, from ‘Nazara’, Truth.

Logion 18 "does a Philip" regarding apostles: observe Till's transcription line 30: the A ends line 29
Screenshot_20221125-074707_Chrome.jpg
Screenshot_20221125-074707_Chrome.jpg (869.82 KiB) Viewed 266 times
Apostolos - apostolikos (and the latter also occurs in logion 70)

There is another gem here (cf. 2 Cor 11:22-24, Phil 3:3,5), yet also in logion 39 as the apostles speak to the disciples there.
Of course the NT fakes their Jesus and disciples and apostles against their own Christian background, but that is an anachronism spanning one or more centuries - we have to pick one of the stories and choose either the Chrestian Jesus, disciples, apostles (and apostolics) or the Christian Jesus, disciples and apostles

Yet you do have a point Mac, and perhaps Paul is talking about the Chrestian apostles, and of course the Synoptics put on stage Christian apostles when they invent their Jesus sending out their apostles after the resurrection invented by them - a scene that couldn't possibly have existed in the Chrestian tradition
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Re: From Chrestian to Christian - Philip beyond the grave

Post by MrMacSon »

mlinssen wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 10:55 pm
Logion 18 "does a Philip" regarding apostles: observe Till's transcription line 30: the A ends line 29

Screenshot_20221125-074707_Chrome.jpg

Apostolos - apostolikos (and the latter also occurs in logion 70)

  • For posterity:

    18. Some say that Mariam was impregnated by the Sacred Spirit. They are confused, they know not what they say. Whenever has a female been impregnated by a female? Mariam is the virgin whom no power has defiled, as she is of grandeur among the consecrations for the Hebrew Apostles and for the Apostolics. Whoever of the powers (attempts to) defile this virgin, [... such] powers are (merely) defiling themselves. And the Lord was not going to say ‘my Father [in] the heavens’, as if he indeed had another father—but rather he said simply [‘my Father’]. https://metalogos.org/files/ph_interlin/ph018.html


mlinssen wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 10:55 pm There is another gem here (cf. 2 Cor 11:22-24, Phil 3:3,5), yet also in logion 39 as the apostles speak to the disciples there.

mlinssen wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 10:55 pm
Of course the NT fakes their Jesus and disciples and apostles against their own Christian background, but that is an anachronism spanning one or more centuries - we have to pick one of the stories and choose either the Chrestian Jesus, disciples, apostles (and apostolics) or the Christian Jesus, disciples and apostles

Yet you do have a point Mac, and perhaps Paul is talking about the Chrestian apostles, and of course the Synoptics put on stage Christian apostles when they invent their Jesus sending out their apostles after the resurrection invented by them - a scene that couldn't possibly have existed in the Chrestian tradition

There's a myriad of possibilities for all the various threads of early Christianity. Frank Zindler has recently proposed a coalescing-thread, 'braided' model of formation and development of early-Christianity, as opposed to the traditional 'dendritic model':


... the dendritic (tree-like) or traditional model of Christian origins...assumes that Christianity began at a specific point in both time and space—in the person of “Jesus of Nazareth”—and then branched out to form the various ancient sects of Christianity ...

A new paradigm is proposed where the various forms of Christianity can be envisioned as forming by the coalescence of various threads (or trajectories) of religious tradition. Some of the threads may trace back into the mists of prehistory, others may trace to the turn of the current era, and still others may have begun in the second or third centuries CE. Not all early forms of Christianity contained the same threads. Not all threads stayed in the braid for long, and still others continued into the present. After entering the braid, threads of tradition evolved, bifurcated, branched off, or were absorbed into other traditions ...

Frank R Zindler, 'A New Paradigm for the Study of Christian Origins: Replacing the Dendritic Model,' SHERM 4/1, Summer 2022: pp.114‒152.
https://www.shermjournal.org/articles/a ... itic-model


One could imagine that if Marcion and early Marcionites were early, and Paul was based on the LXX-OT and elaborated on by the Marcionites; and the Gospel attributed to Mark was based on Paul; and Matthew, Luke and Acts, were based on the Marcionite Euangelion and Mark +/- Paul; and people were variably reading and reacting to the Epistle of Barnabas, the Shepherd of Hermas, the early and evolving Sethians and Valentinians; and several or many other 'traditions' and texts, including G.Thomas (because others had used it); then a one can seen how G.Philip and similar 'apocryphal' texts were part of that milieu
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Re: From Chrestian to Christian - Philip beyond the grave

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Nice work Martijn! :)
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Re: From Chrestian to Christian - Philip beyond the grave

Post by Leucius Charinus »

mlinssen wrote: Wed Nov 23, 2022 5:17 pm
This paper deals with an even more exceptional case, namely the fact that the NHL contains the only text in the entire world that combines ⲭⲣⲏⲥⲧⲓⲁⲛⲟⲥ as well as ⲭⲣⲓⲥⲧⲓⲁⲛⲟⲥ in one and the same text; Philip is this most unique text, and Philip contains it all: ⲓⲥ̅, ⲓ̅ⲏ̅ⲥ, ⲭⲥ̅, ⲭⲣⲥ̅, ⲭⲣⲏⲥⲧⲓⲁⲛⲟⲥ and ⲭⲣⲓⲥⲧⲓⲁⲛⲟⲥ

That is not all: Philip explains what these ligatures signify, whence they derive, yet most importantly: which came before what.
Philip instructs us about Chrestianity preceding Christianity, and how and why Chrestians came to be named Christian.

https://www.academia.edu/89583617/From_ ... _the_grave
Of the series in the study Philip places the ligature ⲭⲥ̅ first.
It occurs prior to (6) in (4) (Patterson-Brown)


The day the ⲭⲥ̅ came !!!

4. A nationalist does not die, for he has never lived so that he could die. Whoever has trusted the truth (became) alive — and this-one is in danger of dying, for he is alive since the day that the ⲭⲥ̅ came.

5. The system is invented, the cities are constructed, the dead carried out.

I take it that a "nationalist" is ἐθνικός (éthnos, “tribe, country, nation”) ? Isenberg, Barnstone and Meyer translates it as "Gentile". Which is the term Christians through to Eusebius (perhaps further) used to mean the Hellenes or the graeco-Roman "nation". The Christians saw the Hebrews as a nation and also saw themselves as a nation. Eusebius uses the term the nation of the Christians here and there, and in Josephus.

Philip introduces the abbreviation ⲭⲥ̅ by telling the reader that the system of these abbreviations in invented / created. What does this mean? It looks like Philip is discussing the ⲭⲥ̅ with reference to an invented system of runes.

What does "the cities are constructed, the dead carried out" mean? Who precisely was " in danger of dying" ?

A Christian interpretation of this might allude to the persecution of Christians. Another interpretation might allude to the persecution and intolerance of the Christians against the Hellenes during the Christian revolution of the 4th century (325-381 CE). The NHL is dated to around the mid 4th century. When did Philip write?

The day the ⲭⲥ̅ came ?

Is Philip referring to the day that the Constantine NT Bible codex appeared to the "pagan" elites in the eastern empire? The day that the eastern empire first beheld the ⲭⲥ̅ in an imperially circulated Greek codex?
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