Pseudo-clementines ignores a crucifixion of Jesus

Discussion about the New Testament, apocrypha, gnostics, church fathers, Christian origins, historical Jesus or otherwise, etc.
Post Reply
User avatar
Giuseppe
Posts: 11767
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:37 am
Location: Italy

Pseudo-clementines ignores a crucifixion of Jesus

Post by Giuseppe »

I don't know if what it ignores is precisely the crucifixion by Pilate or the idea of a redemption by the crucifixion by Pilate.
User avatar
Leucius Charinus
Posts: 1937
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:23 pm
Location: memoriae damnatio

Re: Pseudo-clementines ignores a crucifixion of Jesus

Post by Leucius Charinus »

Giuseppe wrote: Wed Oct 19, 2022 8:46 am I don't know if what it ignores is precisely the crucifixion by Pilate or the idea of a redemption by the crucifixion by Pilate.
It ignores everything about Jesus.

Here is a public domain plot summary:

Plot summary of Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions / Homilies
(adapted from J.B. Lightfoot, The Apostolic Fathers: Clement, Ignatius, and Polycarp [London: MacMillan, 1889], part 1, volume 1, pp. 14-16, with modernizations and clarifications of differing personal names in Recognitions vs. Homilies. Public domain)

The basic plot outlined below by Lightfoot can, in large part, be followed by reading Recognitions, book 1, chapters 1-19 (Clement’s family story and journeys in pursuit of wisdom); book 7, chapters 1-38 (Clement’s and his brothers’ recognitions of his mother = “beggar woman”); book 8, chapters 1-2; book 9, chapters 32-38; and, book 10, chapters 67-72 (Clement’s recognition of his father = “old man”).


Clement, a noble Roman citizen, was connected by birth with the family of the emperors. His father Faustinianus (in Recognitions) [Faustus (in Homilies)] was a near relation and a foster brother of the reigning emperor, and had married one Mattidia, likewise the emperor’s relative. Faustinianus and Mattidia had three sons, the two elder sons, Faustinus and Faustus (in Recognitions) [Faustinus and Faustinianus (in Homilies)], who were twins, and Clement, our protagonist, who was born many years after his brothers.

At the time when Clement first comes before our notice, he is alone in the world. Many years ago, when he was still an infant, Clement’s mother had left home to escape dishonourable sexual advances from her husband’s brother, and had taken her two elder sons with her. Not wishing to reveal his brother’s immorality to Faustinianus [Faustus] (the father), she feigned a dream which warned her to leave home for a time with her twin children. Accordingly she set sail for Athens. After her departure her brother-in-law accused her to her husband of infidelity to her marriage vows. A storm arose at sea, the vessel was wrecked on the shores of Palestine, and she was separated from her children, whom she supposed to have been drowned. Thus she was left a lone woman dependent on the charity of others.

The two sons were captured by pirates and sold to Justa, the Syrophoenician woman, who
educated them as her own children, giving them the names Aquila and Nicetes. As they grew up they became fellow-disciples of Simon Magus, whose doctrines they adopted. Eventually however they were brought to a better mind by the teaching of Zacchaeus, then a visitor to those parts; and through his influence they attached themselves to Peter, whom they accompanied from that time forward on his missionary circuits. They were so engaged at the moment when the narrative, to which we owe this account of their career, presents them to our notice.

Their father Faustinianus [Faustus in Homilies], as the years rolled on and he obtained no news of his wife and two elder children, determined after many fruitless enquiries to go in search of them himself. So he set sail for the East, leaving at home under the charge of guardians his youngest son Clement, then a boy of twelve years. From that time forward Clement heard nothing more of his father and suspected that he had died of grief or been drowned in the sea. Thus Clement grew up as a lonely orphan.

From his childhood, Clement had pondered the deep questions of philosophy, till they took such hold on his mind that he could not shake them off. Clement had especially spent much anxious thought about the immortality of the soul, but with no positive results. The prevailing philosophical systems had all failed to give him the satisfaction which his heart craved. During the reign of Tiberius Caesar, a rumour reached the imperial city that an inspired teacher had appeared in Judea, working miracles and enlisting recruits for the kingdom of God. This report determined him to sail to Judea. Driven by stress of wind to Alexandria and landing there, he fell in with one Barnabas, a Hebrew and a disciple of the teacher, and from him received his first lessons in the teaching of the gospel. From Alexandria he sailed to Caesarea, where he found Peter, the follower and apostle of Jesus, to whom he had been commended by Barnabas. By Peter he was further instructed in the faith, and from him he received baptism. Clement joined his company, and attended Peter on his subsequent journeys. At the moment when Clement meets Peter, Peter has arranged to hold a public discussion with Simon Magus. Clement desires to know something about this false teacher, and is referred to Aquila and Nicetas, who give him an account of Simon’s previous activity and of their own previous connection with him. The public discussion commences, but is broken off abruptly by Simon who escapes from Caesarea by stealth. Peter follows him from city to city, providing the antidote to his baneful teaching.

On the shores of the island of Aradus, Peter encounters a beggar woman, who had lost the use of her hands. In answer to his questions she tells him that she was the wife of a powerful nobleman, that she left home with her two elder sons for reasons which she explains, and that she was shipwrecked and had lost her children at sea. Peter is put off the right scent for the time by her giving feigned names from shame. But the recognition is only delayed. Clement finds in this beggar woman his long-lost mother, and the apostle Peter heals her ailment. Aquila and Nicetas (Clements’ brothers now with these new names) had preceded the apostle Peter to Laodicea. When Peter arrives there, they are surprised to find a strange woman in his company. He relates her story. They are astounded and overjoyed. They declare themselves to be the lost Faustinus and Faustinianus, and she is their mother. It is needless to add that she is converted and baptized. After her baptism they betake themselves to prayer.

While they are returning, Peter initiates a conversation with an old man whom he had observed secretly watching the proceedings. The old man denies the power of prayer. Everything, he says, depends on a man’s birth day and astrological knowledge. A friend of his, a noble Roman, had had the horoscope of his wife cast. It foretold that she would prove unfaithful to him and be drowned at sea. Everything had come to pass in accordance with the prediction. Peter’s suspicions are roused by the story; he asks this friend’s name, and finds that he was none other than Faustinianus [Faustus in Homilies], the husband of Mattidia and father of Clement. The reader comes to realize that the narrator is himself Faustinianus [Faustus], and he had represented the circumstances as happening to a friend, in order to conceal his identity. Thus Clement has recovered the last of his lost relatives, and the “recognitions” are complete.

One other incident however is necessary to crown the story. The father, Faustinianus [Faustus], is still not a believer in Jesus. But the failure of Mattidia's horoscope has led the father to reject his belief in astrological methods. Faustinianus then yields and is baptized.

Benway
Posts: 15
Joined: Tue May 29, 2018 1:04 pm

Re: Pseudo-clementines ignores a crucifixion of Jesus

Post by Benway »

Jesus is mentioned throughout, but I don't remember anything about the crucifixion. They aren't Pauline Christianity. Peter was the disciple of Jesus and taught that the Torah contained errors which Peter can spot, but they obey at least some of the laws. Simon Magus rejects Jesus and is the recurring villain. They are an interesting read.
User avatar
Secret Alias
Posts: 15357
Joined: Sun Apr 19, 2015 8:47 am

Re: Pseudo-clementines ignores a crucifixion of Jesus

Post by Secret Alias »

Why is it my job to straighten out lies and misrepresentations at this site? Don't any of you care about the truth?
For the Teacher Himself, being nailed to the cross, prayed to the Father that the sin of those who slew Him might be forgiven, saying, 'Father, forgive them their sins, for they know not what they do.' They also therefore, being imitators of the Teacher in their sufferings, pray for those who contrive them, as they have been taught. Therefore they are not separated as hating their parents, since they make constant prayers even for those who are neither parents nor relatives, but enemies, and strive to love them, as they have been commanded. [Homilies 11]

But some one perhaps may say that it is possible for any one to imitate a number; but what shall we say of the signs and miracles which He wrought? For Moses had wrought miracles and cures in Egypt. He also of whom he foretold that He should rise up a prophet like himself, though He cured every sickness and infirmity among the people, wrought innumerable miracles, and preached eternal life, was hurried by wicked men to the cross; which deed was, however, by His power turned to good. In short, while He was suffering, all the world suffered with Him; for the sun was darkened, the mountains were torn asunder, the graves were opened, the veil of the temple was rent, as in lamentation for the destruction impending over the place. And yet, though all the world was moved, they themselves are not even now moved to the consideration of these so great things.

Wherefore there is not the least doubt concerning Christ; and all the unbelieving Jews are stirred up with boundless rage against us, fearing lest haply He against whom they have sinned should be He. And their fear grows all the greater, because they know that, as soon as they fixed Him on the cross, the whole world showed sympathy with Him; and that His body, although they guarded it with strict care, could nowhere be found; and that innumerable multitudes are attaching themselves to His faith. Whence they, together with the high priest Caiaphas, were compelled to send to us again and again, that an inquiry might be instituted concerning the truth of His name. And when they were constantly entreating that they might either learn or teach concerning Jesus, whether He were the Christ, it seemed good to us to go up into the temple, and in the presence of all the people to bear witness concerning Him, and at the same time to charge the Jews with many foolish things which they were doing. For the people was now divided into many parties, ever since the days of John the Baptist. [Recognitions 1]

But it is the vice peculiar to ignorance, that it will not bear to have near it the light of truth, which confutes it; and therefore that separation originates with them. For those who receive the knowledge of the truth, because it is full of goodness, desire, if it be possible, to share it with all, as given by the good God; yea, even with those who hate and persecute them: for they know that ignorance is the cause of their sin. Wherefore, in short, the Master Himself, when He was being led to the cross by those who knew Him not, prayed the Father for His murderers, and said, 'Father, forgive their sin, for they know not what they do!' Luke 23:34 The disciples also, in imitation of the Master, even when themselves were suffering, in like manner prayed for their murderers. Acts 7:60 But if we are taught to pray even for our murderers and persecutors, how ought we not to bear the persecutions of parents and relations, and to pray for their conversion? [Recognitions 6]
Blah blah blah
User avatar
Giuseppe
Posts: 11767
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:37 am
Location: Italy

Re: Pseudo-clementines ignores a crucifixion of Jesus

Post by Giuseppe »

Where is Pilate?
User avatar
Leucius Charinus
Posts: 1937
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:23 pm
Location: memoriae damnatio

Re: Pseudo-clementines ignores a crucifixion of Jesus

Post by Leucius Charinus »

Do we care about the truth? The author of the Recognitions is considered by many to be an Arian philosopher writing c.330 CE (during the rule of Constantine).

The Recognitions of Clement is a kind of philosophical and theological romance. The writer of the work seems to have had no intention of presenting his statements as facts; but, choosing the disciples of Christ and their followers as his principal characters, he has put into their mouths the most important of his beliefs, and woven the whole together by a thread of fictitious narrative.

Introductory Notice to The Recognitions of Clement.
By the Translator, Rev. Thomas Smith, D.D.

Post Reply