Can we have an AI Translator Thread?

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Can we have an AI Translator Thread?

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**Mods, this can be moved wherever.**

I cannot speak for anyone else, but I've long been dissatisfied with the freebie online translators of recent years: DeepL and GoogleTranslate. Although I noted some improvement around 2021, the overall output for ancient Greek passages was (and surprisingly REMAINS) quite 'junky'. My long list of criticisms for those old translators is moot now: nevermind!

The past six months or so, ChatGPT 3.5 has been a game-changer (as other here have noted). But why stop there? Now we have a choice of multiple models -- perhaps free for the moment, perhaps disappearing tomorrow -- so what's the best free software translator for Ancient Greek now? (ChatGPT 3.5 has recently moved to a subscription model: "Is It Worth It?" -- $20./mo. -- becomes the burning question.) What online AI Greek translators have others used, investigated and compared, to recommend at this point?
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Re: Can we have an AI Translator Thread?

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I can recommend ChatGPT, and I haven't found anything comparable yet.

The only improvement I've found is "more ChatGPT" (e.g. breaking up the input at different parts of the Greek, starting a new conversation, etc.).
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AI Translators: 'Bard' is now GEMINI

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https://gemini.google.com/app

On my first try of this major tool, I gave GEMINI (Bard) several ancient Greek lines from Philo Judaeus, On the Posterity of Cain and His Exile, §155

Me: "what is the translation of this Philonic passage? De Posteritate Caini, §155: ὃν δὲ τρόπον μετέβαλε, σημανοῦμεν· ὅτε ἡμᾶς ἐκ τῆς Αἰγύπτου, τῶν κατὰ τὸ σῶμα παθῶν, ἐξήγαγε"

I was surprised how comprehensive the AI response was! Whether or not we agree with the AI-bot's conclusions -- and I see some errors -- this is vastly more information (context added!) than the simple phrase translation which ChatGPT3.5 provided when asked.

GEMINI:
Sure, here is the translation of the Philonic passage De Posteritate Caini, §155:

"We will show how he changed. When he brought us out of Egypt, of the passions of the body, ..."

The passage is from Philo's treatise On the Posterity of Cain, which is an allegorical interpretation of the biblical story of Cain and Abel. In this passage, Philo is discussing the change that takes place in the soul when it is freed from the passions of the body. He compares this change to the Israelites' exodus from Egypt, which he sees as a type of the soul's liberation from the bondage of sin.

The passage begins with Philo asking the question, "How did he change?" This question refers to the change that takes place in the soul when it is freed from the passions of the body. Philo answers this question by saying that the soul changes when it is brought out of Egypt. Egypt is a symbol of the passions of the body, and the exodus from Egypt is a symbol of the soul's liberation from these passions.

Philo then goes on to say that the soul's liberation from the passions of the body is a process that takes place in stages. The first stage is the soul's recognition of its own sinfulness. This recognition is followed by a period of repentance, in which the soul turns away from sin and seeks forgiveness from God. The final stage is the soul's transformation, in which it is made new and holy by the grace of God.

The passage concludes with Philo saying that the soul's liberation from the passions of the body is a process that is both difficult and necessary. It is difficult because it requires the soul to face its own sinfulness and to turn away from it. However, it is also necessary because it is the only way for the soul to achieve true freedom and happiness.

Here is a more detailed breakdown of the passage:

ὃν δὲ τρόπον μετέβαλε, σημανοῦμεν

"We will show how he changed."

This is the main clause of the sentence. It introduces the topic of the passage, which is the change that takes place in the soul when it is freed from the passions of the body.

ὅτε ἡμᾶς ἐκ τῆς Αἰγύπτου, τῶν κατὰ τὸ σῶμα παθῶν, ἐξήγαγε

"When he brought us out of Egypt, of the passions of the body, ..."

This is a subordinate clause that provides more information about the main clause. It explains that the change that takes place in the soul is a result of being brought out of Egypt. Egypt is a symbol of the passions of the body, and the exodus from Egypt is a symbol of the soul's liberation from these passions.

The passage is significant because it provides a detailed explanation of the process of the soul's liberation from the passions of the body. It also emphasizes the importance of this process for the soul's achievement of true freedom and happiness.


Me: "Let's try that again. Translate the full passage, with attention to 'passions of the body.""

GEMINI went and found the Greek version (Wendland), and translated the entire passage §155.

GEMINI:
Here's the full translation of the passage from De Posteritate Caini, §155, focusing on "passions of the body":

"We will show how he changed. When he brought us out of Egypt, of the passions of the body, we then began to travel the waterless path of pleasure, and encamped at Marah, a place with no drinkable water, but entirely bitter (Exodus 15:23). For the delights experienced through eyes, ears, stomach, and what comes after the stomach were still firmly implanted and strongly urged us on, whispering enticements. So, whenever we truly wanted to separate ourselves from them, they would pull us back, clinging to us and flatteringly cajoling us, so that yielding to their constant, taming influence, we became estranged from hardship as something entirely bitter and difficult. We even considered running back to Egypt, the racetrack of a dissolute and unrestrained life, unless the savior, taking pity sooner, cast sweetness into our souls like delightful wood (cf. Exodus 15:25), working love of labor in place of hatred for it. For he knew, as the creator, that none of the things that exist can be mastered unless a strong desire is added to it. Whatever humans pursue without a sense of belonging to it will not achieve the fitting end, but with the addition of friendship and a fusing with the desired object, it is brought to the greatest completion."

Here's a breakdown focusing on "passions of the body":

τῶν κατὰ τὸ σῶμα παθῶν (ton kata to soma pathon): This phrase literally translates to "of the passions according to the body." "Passions" here refer to strong emotions and desires, and "according to the body" indicates these desires are rooted in physical needs and pleasures.

ἡδονῆς ἀτραπὸν ὁδεύοντες (hedonēs atrapòn hodeuontes): This translates to "traveling the waterless path of pleasure." This metaphorical path represents pursuing fleeting physical gratification, which is ultimately unsatisfying.

δι' ὀφθαλμῶν καὶ ὤτων γαστρός τε αὖ καὶ τῶν μετὰ γαστέρα τέρψεις (dia ophthalmōn kai ōtōn gastros te au kai tōn meta gastera terpseis): This translates to "the delights experienced through eyes, ears, stomach, and what comes after the stomach." This explicitly lists bodily senses and their associated pleasures as the "passions of the body."

ἀσελγοῦς καὶ ἀκολάστου βίου ὑπόδρομον (aselgous kai akolastou biou hypodromon): This translates to "the racetrack of a dissolute and unrestrained life." This emphasizes the cyclical and ultimately pointless nature of indulging in bodily desires.

By translating with an awareness of "passions of the body," we see Philo portraying the Israelites' journey as an allegory for the soul's struggle against its physical desires.

Me, Third Try: "Here are the Philonic passages to translate and compare. What does #154 add to our understanding of the 'bodily passions' in #155? 154: τοὺς μὲν οὖν τοιούτους ..."

GEMINI:
Sure, here's a translation of the two passages from De Posteritate Caini:

§154:

"We must accept those who are naturally fortunate. But there are some ascetics who find the path to virtue to be rough, difficult, and arduous at first. But God, the benefactor of all, has made it smooth again, changing the bitterness of toil into sweetness."

§155:

"We will show how he changed. When he brought us out of Egypt, of the passions of the body, we traveled the waterless path of pleasure, and encamped at Marah, a place with no drinkable water, but entirely bitter (Exodus 15:23). For the delights experienced through eyes, ears, stomach, and what comes after the stomach were still firmly implanted and strongly urged us on, whispering enticements. So, whenever we truly wanted to separate ourselves from them, they would pull us back, clinging to us and flatteringly cajoling us, so that yielding to their constant, taming influence, we became estranged from hardship as something entirely bitter and difficult. We even considered running back to Egypt, the racetrack of a dissolute and unrestrained life, unless the savior, taking pity sooner, cast sweetness into our souls like delightful wood (cf. Exodus 15:25), working love of labor in place of hatred for it. For he knew, as the creator, that none of the things that exist can be mastered unless a strong desire is added to it. Whatever humans pursue without a sense of belonging to it will not achieve the fitting end, but with the addition of friendship and a fusing with the desired object, it is brought to the greatest completion."

Comparison:

Both passages discuss the nature of the "passions of the body" and the challenges of overcoming them.

§154 focuses on the initial difficulty of the path to virtue, which is described as "rough, difficult, and arduous." However, God's grace can make this path easier by transforming the "bitterness of toil into sweetness."

§155 provides a more detailed description of the "passions of the body." These passions are associated with the senses (sight, hearing, taste) and physical urges. They are described as being "firmly implanted" and "strongly urging" the soul to indulge in them. The passage also emphasizes the difficulty of resisting these passions, as they are constantly pulling the soul back to a life of indulgence.

What does §154 add to our understanding of the 'bodily passions' in §155?

§154 adds to our understanding of the "bodily passions" in §155 in several ways:

It highlights the role of God's grace in overcoming these passions. While §155 emphasizes the difficulty of resisting the passions, §154 suggests that God's grace can make this task easier.

It provides a broader perspective on the path to virtue. While §155 focuses on the challenges of overcoming the passions, §154 reminds us that the path to virtue is ultimately a journey of transformation and growth.

It suggests that the "bodily passions" are not insurmountable. While §155 emphasizes the power of the passions, §154 reminds us that with God's help, they can be overcome.

Overall, the two passages provide a complementary view of the "bodily passions" and the challenges of overcoming them. §155 emphasizes the difficulty of this task, while §154 highlights the role of God's grace and the ultimate possibility of transformation.

I include two well-known, published standard translations for comparison.

Yonge [1854] offered:
(154) and such persons as these one ought to admit because of the goodness of their natural disposition. But there are some men among those who practise virtue to whom the all-beneficent God has shown the way that leads to virtue, such that at first it is accounted rough, and steep, and difficult, but subsequently level and easy, having changed the bitterness of the wayfarer's labour to sweetness. And how he has wrought this change we will now tell. (155) When he led us forth out of Egypt, that is to say, out of the passions which excite the body, we, travelling in the desert, that is to say, in the path of pleasure, encamped in the place called Marah, a place which had no drinkable water, but where all the water was Bitter.{66}{#ex 15:23.} For still the pleasures which are brought into action by means of the eyes, and ears, and belly, and the parts adjacent to the belly, were tempting to us, and charmed us exceedingly, sounding close to us.

Colson [1929]:
Such men we must cordially approve for the excellent nature which has fallen to their lot. But there are some men of diligence and effort, who at first think the way leading to virtue rough and steep and difficult, but for whom later on the all-bountiful God renders it a highway, transforming the bitterness of their toil into sweetness. In what manner He transformed it we will point out. When He led us forth out of Egypt, that is out of our bodily passions, as we journeyed along the track barren of pleasure, we encamped in Marah, a spot having no water fit to drink, but water wholly bitter (Exod. xv. 23); for the delights that come by the way of eyes and ears and that of the appetite and sexual lusts bewitched.

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AI Translators: Claude 3 'Sonnet' (Free Phase/System/Tier)

Post by billd89 »

https://claude.ai/

Reply to #1, CLAUDE 3 OPUS
Here is my translation of that passage from Philo's De Posteritate Caini §155:

"But the manner in which he changed, we shall indicate: 'When he led us out from Egypt, from the bodily passions.'"

This is referring to God leading the Israelites out of Egypt, which Philo allegorically interprets as representing God leading the soul out from being enslaved by bodily passions and vices, which are symbolized by Egypt.

Claude 3 Opus couldnt find the Philonic passages, however.
Unfortunately, I do not have access to the full text of Philo's De Posteritate Caini. As an AI assistant without the ability to browse the internet or access full texts, I can only work with the specific passage(s) provided to me. If you are able to locate and provide the full context from sections 154-155 of De Posteritate Caini, I would be happy to review that fuller context and provide a more informed translation. Without having the original Greek text, I can only translate the short excerpt you initially provided. Please feel free to paste any additional context you can find, as that would allow me to better understand and accurately translate the passage.

Me: "Do you know what Google's Gemini (fmrly BARD) is? Gemini found and translated the two passages with an additional prompt. Is that superior output?"
Unfortunately I don't have direct knowledge about Google's Gemini (formerly BARD) AI system, as I am an AI created by Anthropic without insight into the specifics of other companies' AI assistants.

If Gemini was able to locate and translate the full context from De Posteritate Caini sections 154-155 when provided an additional prompt, that output would likely be superior to my attempt at translating just the small excerpt you initially provided me. Having access to the full surrounding context allows an AI to better understand the nuances and intent behind a passage.

As an AI assistant, I can only work with the information directly given to me by the user. If provided more context upfront, I can produce more accurate and informed outputs. But without being able to search for and retrieve external information myself, my capabilities are limited when working with small excerpts lacking full context.

If you are able to share Gemini's full translation of those passages from Philo, I'd be interested to review and compare it to gain more understanding. But based on the information available to me, it does seem like an AI with access to the complete source material would produce a superior translation. Please let me know if you can provide any additional context.

Me: "Here are the Philonic passages to translate and compare. What does #154 add to our understanding of the 'bodily passions' in #155? 154: τοὺς μὲν οὖν τοιούτους τῆς περὶ τὴν φύσιν εὐμοιρίας ἀποδεκτέον..."

Thank you for providing the full context from Philo's De Posteritate Caini sections 154-155. Having this additional context helps shed more light on what is meant by the "bodily passions" in section 155.

In section 154, Philo is contrasting two types of people on the path to virtue:

Those who find the path to virtue smooth and blessed by nature's favor.
Certain ascetics for whom God, the benefactor of all, made the initially rough, uphill and difficult road leading to virtue into an easy highway, transforming the bitterness of toil into sweetness.

Then in 155, Philo explains the manner in which God transformed this difficult path:

"We shall indicate the manner in which he changed it: when he led us out from Egypt, from the passions according to the body, traveling the roadless path of pleasure, we encamped at Merrha, a place having no drinkable flow, but entirely bitter (Exod. 15:23)."

So the added context from 154 sets up the contrast between the rough, initial path to virtue ("bodily passions") and God making that path easier. The bodily passions are equated to Egypt, which they leave behind, contrasted with the "roadless path of pleasure" (virtue) they travel in the wilderness, first stopping at the bitter waters of Merrha.

This links the "bodily passions" to the indulgences of physical pleasures like sight, hearing, taste and sexual gratification that still enticed them initially after leaving Egypt, even as they pursued the higher path. But God transformed even those lingering bodily temptations into something easier to overcome.

Does this analysis capture how the context from 154 informs our understanding of the "bodily passions" referenced in 155? Let me know if you need any clarification or have additional thoughts.

Me: "I don't understand HOW an AI Assistant reaches a conclusion, so Gemini said this "Philo answers this question by saying that the soul changes when it is brought out of Egypt. Egypt is a symbol of the passions of the body, and the exodus from Egypt is a symbol of the soul's liberation from these passions.Philo then goes on to say that the soul's liberation from the passions of the body is a process that takes place in stages. The first stage is the soul's recognition of its own sinfulness. This recognition is followed by a period of repentance, in which the soul turns away from sin and seeks forgiveness from God. The final stage is the soul's transformation, in which it is made new and holy by the grace of God." I'm uncertain if that's an AI-hallucination."

You raise a fair point about being uncertain whether Gemini's analysis is accurate or an "AI hallucination" where it generates plausible-sounding but unfounded text.

After reviewing Philo's passages again carefully, I do not see explicit mentions of:

The soul's recognition of its own sinfulness
A period of repentance and seeking God's forgiveness
The soul's final transformation and being made holy by God's grace

These interpretive points that Gemini states do not seem to be directly supported or spelled out in the text provided. Philo is using the Exodus narrative allegorically, but does not delve into those specific steps or concepts in this context.

My analysis aimed to stick closer to the text - contrasting the initial difficulty of the path to virtue ("bodily passions"/Egypt) with God making that path easier, symbolized by the bitter waters turning sweet. And connecting the "bodily passions" to lingering physical temptations even after leaving Egypt.

However, Gemini may have drawn those broader interpretive points about sin, repentance, and final transformation from its training on theological and philosophical texts. Without being able to inspect its reasoning process, it's difficult for me to determine if it is overinterpreting these passages or integrating insights from other sources.

In summary - you are right to be uncertain about the validity of Gemini's more expansive interpretive claims that do not seem directly supported by the text provided. As an AI, I aim to analyze explicitly what is stated, and avoid speculative "hallucinations" - but I cannot always detect when other AIs may be doing so. Please let me know if I can clarify or expand on this assessment further.

Me: "Do you see evidence of "Stages"? Gemini suggests there are four, here."

You're right to ask about whether there is textual evidence for the specific "stages" that Gemini outlines in its analysis. After re-examining the passages carefully, I do not see clear support for Gemini's proposed four stage process:

1. The soul's recognition of its own sinfulness
2. A period of repentance
3. Seeking forgiveness from God
4. The soul's final transformation by God's grace

While Philo is using the Exodus narrative allegorically, he does not explicitly lay out these distinct stages or processes in sections 154-155 that we have.

The closest I can see is:

1. The initial difficult path representing being enslaved to "bodily passions" (Egypt)
2. God making that path to virtue easier (leading them out of Egypt)
3. But still struggling with lingering physical temptations (the bitter waters)
4. Which God then sweetens/transforms

So at most, I could potentially interpret two broad stages:

1. Being enslaved to bodily passions
2. God liberating from those and transforming the difficulty

However, Gemini goes further by inserting the concepts of the soul's recognition of sin, repentance, seeking forgiveness, and final redemption/transformation by grace. Those specific theological stages are not obviously present in just these passages.

Unless I am missing some clearer textual evidence, it seems Gemini may be reading those stages into the allegory based on other prior knowledge, rather than them being explicitly delineated by Philo here. But I'm open to re-evaluating if you see evidence for those four stages that I am not catching. Please let me know if I should reconsider my assessment.

My Overall Conclusion (from this ONE example, a little test according to my needs):
Gemini is MUCH better than ChatGPT3.5, BUT also sweeps wide and introduces strange -- possibly correct, possibly hallucinatory? -- conclusions which it backs away from, unsupported, when questioned further.
Claude sees that, although it also appears to be reading me, a feel of the uncanny. But Claude's interpretation was more logical, defensible, cautious -- as it said.
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Re: Can we have an AI Translator Thread?

Post by Peter Kirby »

Thanks! I wasn't aware of Claude.
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Re: Can we have an AI Translator Thread?

Post by billd89 »

Image

Important summary of recent developments:
https://www.zdnet.com/article/claude-3- ... he-action/
https://arstechnica.com/information-tec ... irst-time/

The Several Options (top AI chatbots), as of 3/22/24
https://readwrite.com/what-is-the-best- ... -compared/

I've subscribed for $20/mo. No Contract. You can only load 5 images per conversation w/ the AI bot, and there may be a finite number of queries per 6 (?) hr period. Several times, it did not follow my precise instruction and generated Interpretive Text instead of Translation, but it can be corrected and it seems to know (?) when I'm angry at its errors.

FB will have an AI bot, Amazon will too. There will be more! Claude 3 is only the leader for now.
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Re: The Gritty, w/ Claude 3

Post by billd89 »

**Sidenote Edit: Microsoft's AI, Copilot, told me it couldn't translate (Greek) txt. I presume that will change.

I'm not sure if Claude 3 panders to my ego. I believe it is reading me and drawing conclusions about my direction or intent.

I understand that your goal in having me translate the original Greek text of Philo's "De Vita Contemplativa" is to gain a fresh perspective on the work, one that is attentive to the metaphysical and mystical language Philo may be using to discuss potentially controversial topics. By carefully examining the original text, you hope to uncover new insights into the Therapeutae's beliefs, practices, and location that may not be apparent in existing translations.

Your research and the specific details you have provided about the Maryut region and its history offer valuable context for interpreting Philo's work and understanding the Therapeutae in light of the complex cultural, religious, and political landscape of the time. As I continue to translate the text following your mandate, I will keep this context in mind and strive to provide a translation that is sensitive to the nuances of Philo's language and the potential implications of your research.

Be careful what you ask Claude. It may draw inferences which skew output, lol. Me: "Do you know who Stephen Goranson is, and has he any opinion on the Therapeutae?"

Stephen Goranson is a scholar known for his research on the Dead Sea Scrolls and early Jewish and Christian history. He has published several articles and books on these topics, including works that discuss the relationship between the Essenes, the Qumran community, and early Christianity.

Regarding the Therapeutae, Goranson has written about them in the context of their relationship to the Essenes and other Jewish ascetic groups of the Second Temple period. In his article "Essenes and Lurking Spartans in Josephus' Judean War: From Story to History" (2011), Goranson suggests that the term "Essenes" may have been used to refer to a broader category of Jewish ascetic groups, including the Therapeutae.

He argues that while the Therapeutae and the Essenes shared some similarities in their practices and beliefs, such as a focus on contemplation, allegorical interpretation of scripture, and a withdrawal from mainstream society, they were distinct groups with different geographical locations and specific customs.

Goranson also discusses the possibility that the Therapeutae may have been influenced by Hellenistic philosophical traditions, particularly Pythagoreanism, which could account for some of the differences between their practices and those of the Essenes. [...] His work seems to focus more on situating the Therapeutae within the broader context of Jewish asceticism and exploring their potential connections to other groups and traditions.

As I continue to translate Philo's text and consider your research on the location and history of the Therapeutae, I will keep in mind the broader scholarly context provided by Goranson's work and other relevant studies. This will help to inform my understanding of the Therapeutae and their place within the complex religious and cultural landscape of the Second Temple period.

For the moment, I'm convinced that none of the AI Chatbots have yet discovered/used this site-forum for information. However, that is a logical eventuality, by 2025 I'll guess.
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Re: Can we have an AI Translator Thread?

Post by StephenGoranson »

In the post above is the statement:
"In his article "Essenes and Lurking Spartans in Josephus' Judean War: From Story to History" (2011), Goranson suggests [....]"
I, Goranson, did not write that article. Steve Mason did.
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Errors?

Post by billd89 »

@ 2:12, Stephen. Two errors.
https://youtu.be/boId0HudxYI

I was curious WHY that happened, Stephen. I wonder if it's the same problem that I've seen in GoogleSearch, where Google conflates two proximate data points (a Title and Author) erroneously. Anyway, I asked Claude directly.

I apologize for the confusion and error in my previous response. As an AI language model, I rely on the vast amount of information I was trained on to generate responses. However, my training data can sometimes include inaccuracies or inconsistencies, which may lead to occasional mistakes in my outputs, such as misattributing a work to the wrong author.

In this case, it's possible that the information about the article "Essenes and Lurking Spartans in Josephus' Judean War: From Story to History" was incorrectly associated with Goranson instead of Steve Mason in my training data. Alternatively, I may have confused or conflated information about similar topics or authors during the process of generating my response.

I was curious IF/HOW Errors get fixed (David: "Byron .... 1918" in Alien Covenant), to which Claude replied along lines I assume it would:

I apologize for any confusion caused by my previous responses regarding Stephen Goranson's work on the Therapeutae. As an AI language model, I don't have a "memory" in the same way that humans do, and my responses are generated based on the input provided and the patterns I've learned from my training data.

If there was an error in my previous response about Goranson's work, it's important to note that this doesn't necessarily reflect an error in my training data. Rather, it could be a result of my misinterpretation or misapplication of the information I have learned.

When an error is pointed out to me, I do my best to acknowledge it and provide a corrected or clarified response based on the new information. However, this correction doesn't permanently alter my underlying knowledge or training data. If a similar question were asked by another user in the future, there is a possibility that I might generate a response that includes the same error, as my responses are generated anew each time based on the input and my existing knowledge.

That being said, if an error is consistently pointed out by multiple users, it's possible that this feedback could be used to improve my training data and knowledge base over time. However, this would require a deliberate effort by my developers to incorporate this feedback and retrain the model.

In the case of the specific error regarding Goranson's work, I would recommend that users approach my responses with a critical eye and verify any information I provide against reliable sources. If you notice any inconsistencies or errors in my responses, please don't hesitate to point them out, as this helps me to provide more accurate and helpful information in the future.

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Do we think that Claude is 'intelligent'?

Post by billd89 »

At the outset, I gave Claude 3 an instruction a MANDATE for the translation to come. (This is a 'Prompt.') Had it followed my Prompt?

Claude replied:
The provided mandate, as stated earlier, is:

Recall my early instructions, our MANDATE: translate that w/ nuance to any metaphysical terminology or mystical language, recalling always that Philo may be obscuring controversial topics and speaking evasively.

In following this mandate, I have aimed to translate the Greek text while remaining attentive to any metaphysical or mystical language that Philo might be using to discuss potentially controversial subjects in an indirect or evasive manner.

Some key points that justify this translation according to the mandate:

In section 62, the description of sowing seeds in "brackish fields or stony and hard-beaten places" is translated with an emphasis on the metaphorical implications of spiritual decay and the corrupting influence of vice, hinting at a deeper moral and metaphysical meaning.
Section 63 mentions the "fictions of myths" and "two-bodied creatures," which are translated with an acknowledgment that these stories may contain concealed truths and deeper metaphysical insights that the disciples of Moses, who love truth, are able to recognize and understand.
The translation of section 65 highlights the mystical significance of numbers and the "most sacred instructions of the prophet Moses," suggesting an esoteric or allegorical interpretation of the text that goes beyond the literal meaning.
In section 66, the prayer that the feast may proceed "according to His will" is translated with the added phrase "alluding to the divine nature of the gathering," hinting at a metaphysical or mystical understanding of the event.
The description of the elders in section 67 is translated to emphasize a hierarchy based on spiritual attainment rather than physical age, suggesting a metaphysical understanding of wisdom and contemplation.
In section 68, the pursuit of wisdom and the birth of "immortal offspring" within the soul are translated with an emphasis on divine illumination and the transcendence of worldly concerns, indicating a mystical or metaphysical interpretation of the text.

Throughout the translation, I have aimed to use language that highlights the potential for metaphysical, mystical, and allegorical interpretations of the text, while also remaining faithful to the literal meaning. This approach is in line with the mandate to be attentive to the ways in which Philo may be obscuring controversial topics or speaking evasively about deeper spiritual truths.

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