The SOUL of the Indian - Ohiyesa (Dr Charles A. Eastman) 1911

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Leucius Charinus
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The SOUL of the Indian - Ohiyesa (Dr Charles A. Eastman) 1911

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The SOUL of the Indian
Ohiyesa (Dr Charles A. Eastman)
First Published 1911

http://mountainman.com.au/eastman.html

INDEX

Chapter 0 - Introduction/Forward {Author}
Chapter 1 - The Great Mystery
Chapter 2 - The Family Altar
Chapter 3 - Ceremonial & Symbolic Worship
Chapter 4 - Barbarism and the Moral Code
Chapter 5 - The Unwritten Scripture
Chapter 6 - On the Border-Land of Spirits
Chapter 7 - Editorial - Mountain Man, Oz.
Chapter 8 - Credits, Links, Misc.


Sample extract - from Chapter 1 - The Great Mystery

The Paradox of "Christian Civilization"

There was undoubtedly much in primitive Christianity to appeal to this man, and Jesus' hard sayings to the rich and about the rich would have been entirely comprehensible to him. Yet the religion that is preached in our churches and practiced by our congregations, with its element of display and self-aggrandizement, its active proselytism, and its open contempt of all religions but its own, was for a long time extremely repellent. To his simple mind, the professionalism of the pulpit, the paid exhorter, the moneyed church, was an unspiritual and unedifying, and it was not until his spirit was broken and his moral and physical constitution undermined by trade, conquest, and strong drink, that Christian missionaries obtained any real hold upon him. Strange as it may seem, it is true that the proud pagan in his secret soul despised the good men who came to convert and to enlighten him!

Nor were its publicity and its Phariseeism the only elements in the alien religion that offended the red man. To him, it appeared shocking and almost incredible that there were among this people who claimed superiority many irreligious, who did not even pretend to profess the national. Not only did they not profess it, but they stooped so low as to insult their God with profane and sacrilegious speech! In our own tongue His name was not spoken aloud, even with utmost reverence, much less lightly or irreverently.

More than this, even in those white men who professed religion we found much inconsistency of conduct. They spoke much of spiritual things, while seeking only the material. They bought and sold everything, labor, personal independence, the love of woman, and even the ministrations of their holy faith! The lust for money, power, and conquest so characteristic of the Anglo-Saxon race did not escape moral condemnation at the hands of his untutored judge, nor did he fail to contrast this conspicuous trait of the dominant race with the spirit of the meek and lowly Jesus.

He might in time come to recognize that the drunkards and licentious among white men, with whom he too frequently came in contact, were condemned by the white man's religion as well, and must not be held to discredit it. But it was not so easy to overlook or to excuse national bad faith. When distinguished emissaries from the Father at Washington, some of them ministers of the gospel and even bishops, came to the Indian nations, and pledged to them in solemn treaty the national honor, with prayer and mention of their God; and when such treaties, so made, were promptly and shamelessly broken, is it strange that the action should arouse not only anger, but contempt? The historians of the white race admit that the Indian was never the first to repudiate his oath.

It is my personal belief, after thirty-five years' experience of it, that there is no such thing as "Christian Civilization." I believe that Christianity and modern civilization are opposed and irreconcilable, and that the spirit of Christianity and of our ancient religion is essentially the same.


Dr Charles Alexander Eastman, 1911
born Ohiyesa of the Santee Sioux, in 1858

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